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BENEFITS & PERKS–ATTRACTING & RETAINING TOP TALENT

Perks

In today’s tight job market, many employers realize that they need to take a closer look at their benefits package in an effort to attract and retain employees.  How often have you found a qualified candidate that you hope to hire only to learn that they decide to go with another position?  Most likely, the candidate has found another job in which the benefits offered by the competition were more attractive.

When reviewing the development of benefits and perks for your company, it is valuable to understand the differences.  Benefits are a form of non-wage compensation that supplement salary (e.g., health insurance). Perks are a form of non-wage compensation (e.g., work from home Fridays), but unlike benefits, are more loosely defined and vary greatly.

Glassdoor indicates that 57% of job seekers list benefits and perks among the chief determinants when evaluating jobs.  Benefits and perks impact recruiting efforts as they help to get prospective talent interested in a company and through the door.

The primary benefits and perks that prospective job seekers value most when considering a new position include (listed in order of importance):

  • Better health, dental, and vision insurance
  • More flexible hours
  • More vacation time
  • Work from home options
  • Retirement benefits; pension plan, 401K

Although there are some new, innovative benefits and perks being offered such as free-snacks or nap pods—the top benefits/perks valued by many employees are those that improve their work/life balance.

Some innovative, non-traditional benefits/perks offered by large companies and tech-based companies include:

  • Unlimited vacation
  • Student loan assistance
  • Free gym membership
  • Free day care services
  • Free fitness or yoga classes offered on-site
  • Catered breakfast and/or lunch
  • Company-wide retreats
  • Paid volunteer days
  • Paid parental leave for moms and dads (16+ weeks)
  • Dedicated game rooms
  • Nap rooms

Although the benefits and perks offered can help get prospective talent through the door of your organization, once hired, it is the culture, values, and career opportunities that are the leading factors in employee satisfaction.  Employee interests vary depending on company size, industry and demographics.  To find the benefits package that best fits your business, it’s important to survey employees about what they value most.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data, and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is a custom-built survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

Posted in Benefits & Compensation on October 31st, 2018 · Comments Off on BENEFITS & PERKS–ATTRACTING & RETAINING TOP TALENT

MINDFULNESS: EMBRACED BY BUSINESS

In a world where multitasking and information overload are the norms, an old idea, ‘mindfulness’, is becoming increasingly appealing to organizations who are effectively applying it to their businesses. Mindfulness is training the mind to focus. Our ability to concentrate is seriously compromised the more we multitask. And technology, though useful to us in so many ways has actually impeded our ability to concentrate or to be mindful of what matters moment by moment. If you would like to investigate further for your organization or for yourself, Psychology Today has an overview of the practice on their website (http://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/mindfulness).

Many Fortune 500 and other organizations are embracing and promoting mindfulness for their workforce. Business schools are beginning to teach mindfulness and it is included in many MBA programs. In the workplace, mindfulness is a skill that aids concentration, clarity, and equanimity. Present moment awareness keeps your mind from dwelling on the past or obsessing about the future. Becoming more aware of what is going on around you allows us to be fully focused on the task at hand and more likely to spot opportunities. Mindfulness makes us more conscious of what is going on within us, helping to identify and remove subconscious thinking that can be obstacles to success. Mindfulness also enhances creativity, innovation, and improves the brain’s ability to process information. So it is not surprising that more and more corporations are embracing mindfulness as a business practice.

To be mindful is to be aware, to be conscious, to be aware, and to appreciate the impact of one’s actions. Mindfulness is a mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly witnessing one’s thoughts and feelings without judgment. Mindfulness is a 2,500-year-old tradition of Eastern cultures that now is considered a science of the mind. Many consider mindfulness to have its origins in Buddhism; however, it can be traced back more than 2,500 years ago, when Hindus practiced a range of meditations, which included mindfulness.

It may be time to consider mindfulness, as a business skill. Extensive research has been done over the last 15 years that show mindfulness is linked to psychological and physical, health. It decreases blood pressure, regulates the heart, increases the immune function, and enhances memory. It essentially rewires our brain. The idea that increasing mindfulness may lead to better decision-making deserves attention.
At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

WHEN TO EMPLOY SHORT-TERM AND LONG-TERM INCENTIVES

An employee compensation plan should provide a competitive wage and reward employees fairly and equitably for behaviors while accomplishing goals and objectives for the organization. Compensation is the reward an employee receives in return for his or her contribution to the organization.  Basic components of a compensation package include base salary, incentives, and benefits.

Organizations implement incentive plans to help reach overall goals and objectives.  Incentive plans range from variable pay plans to prizes and recognition awards.   Incentive plans can motivate employees to go beyond expectations and produce results that contribute to business success.  They also can attract new talent and encourage company loyalty.  For an incentive plan to be effective, the goals must be obtainable.

So how do you determine whether a short-term or long-term incentive is appropriate?  Short-term incentives are used to create the focus on short-term or immediate goals, and align rewards with individual and business performance.  Long-term incentives are typically designed for executives who make strategic decisions for the company.  They can ensure focus on what’s best for the organization’s future outcomes by placing importance on medium and/or long-term goals and creating a sense of ownership of those goals.  Successful incentive plans can also help organizations align rewards with shareholder interests, and help retain key talent.

Short-term incentives can be for all employee levels from entry level to middle management to the executive level and they can be big or small and can cover a week, month, quarter or year of performance measurements and goals.  Short term incentives can create a better work environment and motivate employees to work to their greatest potential.  Without short-term incentives, employees may feel that their work is unappreciated and morale can be low.  Short-term incentives align employees work with the overall success of the company and can clearly define an employee’s specific role in contributing to that success.  Short-term incentives such as prizes, free airline tickets or hotel stays, tickets to events or a paid day off can have high impact.  Short-term incentives can be individual and/or team based.  Rewarding employees for clearly defined goals can go a long way to creating happy employees who work well alone and together striving for success.

It is important to use both the short and the long-term initiatives to produce desired results. Incentive programs that are carefully and strategically crafted and aligned with company goals and timeframes should lead to more productive, motivated and loyal team members.  Retaining good employees saves organizations the expense of recruiting and training new workers.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

DRAMATIC CHANGES FOR PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

Organizations are exploring some new and innovative performance management systems in an effort to truly inspire and motivate their teams with some encouraging results. Traditional performance management systems typically set goals related to the business plan, utilize performance appraisals that are too lengthy, redundant, hastily completed to meet deadlines, and often don’t allow employees any real input.  Many HR leaders believe that performance reviews yield inaccurate results due to biased approaches and misleading inputs.  Performance Appraisals are essentially a forced ranking system that can actually be very demotivating.

The traditional systems are beginning to shift to a more effective coaching system that focuses on employee achievement of measurable goals and objectives rather than formalized annual appraisal systems that primarily communicate one-way.  There are many examples of progressive companies that have replaced their traditional performance management systems with a culture of coaching, feedback, development, and high performance. Critical to success is that everyone in a leadership role is trained on how to coach and provide constant performance feedback, which in turn, engages employees and creates a desire to continuously improve.

The goal of managing performance is being replaced with a goal of obtaining the best possible sustainable performance under the current circumstances.   Key elements of this new paradigm include:

  • Simplify the Process:  Train managers on how to coach, give feedback and regularly check in with employees.  Focus on developing employees rather than evaluating and giving them a ‘rating’.  Ask questions that help target what the employee needs, such as, “What skills would you most like to improve on?” or “What can I do to help you?” Review employee progress more frequently making the process less intimidating and more sensitive.
  • Streamline, shorten or completely replace Performance Review forms:  Replace the forms with on-going coaching and feedback.  Feedback must be timely to be meaningful.
  • More agile, relevant, frequent and transparent goal management:  Include employees in the discussion of key performance objectives, ensuring they understand the reasons for the goals and can see how they are linked to organizational goals.  Utilize more short term goals that are easier for employees to derive meaning from what they do every day.  Create achievable goals and regularly monitor employee progress.
  • Address career goals and future training needs:  Include a system that supports follow-up and delivery of the training and career opportunities.  Create a culture where managers can delegate without feeling threatened, knowing they also have opportunity and training for the next career advancement.
  • Eliminate direct correlation between performance rating and compensation:  Make pay adjustments based on a combination of elements such as performance, customer and business impact, skill scarcity and the competitive nature of employees’ positions.

Employees want to perform at their best.  They want to understand the goals and to be motivated.  They want to contribute, be supported, to learn and to have fun.  Management and leaders need to create the conditions needed for a great performance to take place and for business to flourish.  The ideal process for managing performance is one that successfully motivates and supports staff to contribute to the achievement of the goals and objectives of the organization.  A culture that encourages on-going communication and coaching between managers and their employees has many benefits and advantages over traditional Performance Management.

Change can be challenging and demanding.  At WageWatch our compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs and help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary surveys that will allow you to stay current with the times.  This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards.  For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data, and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

HOW TO DETERMINE NEW HIRE SALARIES

Without established salary ranges and salary structure, setting a salary can be like spinning the roulette wheel.  Most companies have salary offer guidelines based on competitor market data and established salary ranges for positions.  Ideally, you will have these established tools and practices in place before you have to make a salary offer.  Salary scales are a valuable tool in recruiting and hiring new employees as well as providing baseline amounts in making salary adjustments for existing employees.

There are many things to consider when determining where to set a salary for a new hire including the candidate’s experience and qualifications that are either required or needed for the job, current salaries of employees in the same or comparable worth jobs, salary range, geography, industry conventions and company budget.  Other considerations may be bargaining agreements, prevailing wage contracts or arrangements, and the company’s compensation philosophy.

To determine accurate external wage comparisons, employers should carefully define the appropriate market and competitive set.  Defining the market too narrowly can result in wages that are higher than necessary. Conversely, defining the market too broadly may cause an organization to set wages too low to attract and retain competent employees. Paying prevailing wages can also be considered a moral obligation.  This focus on external competitiveness enables a company to develop compensation structures and programs that are competitive with other companies in appropriate labor markets.  Employee perceptions of equity and inequity are equally important and should be carefully considered when a company sets compensation objectives. Employees who perceive equitable pay treatment may be more motivated to perform better or to support a company’s goals.

Internal equity is of equal importance to external competitiveness when setting pay.  You want employees to feel they are paid fairly as compared to their co-workers as well as to adhere to regulations regarding pay discrimination.  If starting salaries are negotiated, ensure that such a practice does not have an adverse impact on women or minority workers.  Generally, jobs do not have to be identical for equal pay to be required, only substantially equal in terms of skill, effort, and job responsibility, and performed under similar working conditions. For discriminatory purposes, pay refers to salary, overtime, bonuses, vacation and holiday pay, and all other benefits and compensation of any kind paid to employees.  Pay disparities may be allowed under a seniority system, a merit system or a system measuring earnings by quality or quantity of production.  Hardly anyone notices when you pay “above average” compared to the outside world, but any perceived deficiency in “internal equity” can come back to bite you.

As you can see there are many factors and considerations when setting pay and it can sometimes feel like a delicate balancing act.  But doing your homework, keeping up with the external market and addressing internal pay inequities will go a long way to simplifying the task of setting new hire salaries.  It is important to ensure that the approach taken is guided by the compensation philosophy and is applied consistently. An effective Salary Administration Program allows a company to meet the basic objectives of compensation:  focus, attract, retain, and motivate.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

JOINT EMPLOYER LIABILITY

The use of sub-contractors, temporary staffing, leased employees and independent contractors can provide employers with quick temporary staffing and reduce benefits and payroll costs. However, the employer client can be considered a joint employer with the leasing or temporary agency when they share certain key employment terms such as the ability to hire, fire or discipline the workers, affect their compensation and benefits, and direct and supervise their performance.  When businesses use temporary agency, leased, or contract workers, though the employer is the temporary help, leasing, or contracting company, the client business may be regarded as a joint employer under some laws.

The Family and Medical Leave Act has specific language regarding joint employer relationships. While the leasing or temporary help agency is the primary employer, the client company may be required to place the worker in the same or comparable position upon his or her return from FMLA leave.  Additionally, leased and temporary workers will count as employees of the client company for the purposes of determining whether a business is subject to the FMLA regulations.

In the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982, leased and temporary workers are the client’s employees for the purposes of qualifying retirement plans and certain fringe benefits such as life insurance and cafeteria plans (does not apply to health insurance benefits), if the workers have been engaged with the client company on a full-time basis for a minimum of one year and the client company primarily controls or directs their work.

An employer can face a charge of discrimination under Title VII anti-discrimination legislation brought by an individual who worked for the employer under one of these leasing or sub-contractor relationships.

It has also come into question with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) whether leased and temporary workers must be included in collective bargaining agreements that cover the client’s regular employees.

Some states have passed legislation on joint employer liability as it pertains to workers’ compensation regulation.  New York ruled that the client is the common law employer of leased employees and is therefore primarily responsible for providing workers’ compensation benefits. To date there have been no guidelines for joint employer status under OSHA or other health and safety regulations.

Employers need to be aware of and have guidelines regarding the degree of control they have over these temporary, leased and contract workers. The greater the degree of control, the greater the likelihood that the employer could be determined to be a joint employer.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

Market Analysis: Median or Mean

Median and mean are useful measures of distribution that identify central values and tendencies of a data set. In a WageWatch compensation survey, median is the middle wage in a set of ranked market wages, which separates the data set in half. When an even number of wages are ranked, with no true middle value, the average of the two middle data points is the median wage. Median is also called the 50th percentile.

The arithmetic mean which is also called the simple average or mean is one of the most commonly used statistics in business. One of the reasons is that it is very easy to calculate. It is the sum of all values of a data set divided by the number of values in that set.

In a normal distribution of data, the median and mean wages will be within a few cents of each other. When the mean is greater than the median, this indicates the data set is skewed towards higher wages. Similarly, when the mean is less than the median, this indicates the data set is skewed towards lower wages. Skewing typically occurs for one of two reasons: either the data set is not normally distributed, or the mean is affected by outliers or errors in the data set. The first situation is not uncommon and occurs when there is either wage compression or the data is bimodal, meaning that the job description may be too broad and need to be bifurcated into two job titles. The second reason for the mean and the median being significantly different, due to an outlier or data error, is much more of a concern.

Here is an example of how data affects the median and mean differently when an outlier is added to the data set.

Wages in Data Set A                                                        Wages in Data Set B
$9.25                                                                                      $9.25
$10.11                                                                                    $10.11
$10.56                                                                                   $10.56
$11.98                                                                                    $11.98
$12.50                                                                                   $12.05
$12.88                                                                                    $12.31
$125.00

Set A Median Wage $11.27                                          Set B Median Wage $11.98
Set A Mean Wage $11.21                                              Set B Mean Wage $27.32

In this example, it is clear that once the $125.00 value is added as an outlier, the median wage becomes the better indication of the central value. Comparing the median with the mean from Set B tells us that while the middle wage or median is $11.98, there appear to be employers paying at the top of the market, skewing the mean up sharply. The only way to know for certain if the difference between the median and mean is due to an error is a more thorough analysis of the data. If more data analysis is not possible, then the median is your better statistic to use.

WageWatch, Inc. is the leading compensation survey provider for over 5,000 hotels, non-profits organizations, healthcare organizations and management companies. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.

How to Avoid Antitrust Claims When Conducting Wage Surveys: Part 2

As stated in our previous post, we will now cover the proper steps to take in order to minimize risk when deciding to share wage and benefit information with a competitor. The safest course of action for human resource directors to follow is to not discuss wage and benefit information with competitors except in controlled and limited situations. The following is a summary of the steps that WageWatch recommends to minimize your risk if you intend to share data:

  • -Employers should act unilaterally about setting wages and benefits.  There should not be an agreement or understanding, written or oral, with respect to fixing, maintaining or stabilizing wages and benefits.
  • -The wage and benefit information should not be exchanged directly between employers.  This means no phone calls or round tables where information is exchanged.
  • -A third party should be utilized in order to make sure that no employer has direct access to each other’s data. Participation in a WageWatch compensation survey can be part of a defense against accusations of antitrust violations. The WageWatch Hospitality Industry Competitive Market Survey complies with all DOJ safe harbor guidelines.
  • -The information that is disseminated by the third party should be aggregated.  The ranges or averages of the wages and benefits cannot be disseminated if it can be related to a particular organization or a specific job.  This eliminates the once prevalent practice of tabulating the data for each employer in a spreadsheet format even if the name of the particular employer associated with that data was excluded.
  • -Each aggregated wage or benefit statistic disseminated should be a composite of at least five different employers.
  • -The disseminated statistics must be “historical”.  This means the older the better.  The aggregated information disseminated to participants should not reflect current or prospective wages and benefits.  Current is defined as wages or benefits that having been in effect for less than three months.

While the above is an overview of steps to be taken when considering exchanging wage and benefit information between hotels, consultation with your legal counsel is recommended before participating in any exchange of wage and benefit information with competitors.

For 13 years, WageWatch has been providing expert services across multiple industries and geographic markets with cost-effective online compensation and salary surveys. We are an innovative organization that is always on the lookout for new ways to collect compensation and salary data for surveys and wage reports, allowing us to expand continuously into new industries and markets.

Please call us today at 480-237-6130 or contact us online to learn more about our services.

Posted in Regulatory & Legal Updates on September 5th, 2012 · Comments Off on How to Avoid Antitrust Claims When Conducting Wage Surveys: Part 2

How to Avoid Antitrust Claims When Conducting Wage Surveys: Part 1

Hotel human resource professionals frequently participate in professional associations, industry groups and other organizations formed to facilitate information sharing and networking.  Few are aware that such activity, if it involves the sharing of cost-related information such as employee wages and benefits, could give rise to violations of antitrust law or be used as evidence of such violations.

There have been a number of antitrust cases brought by plaintiffs in different industries regarding the exchange of wage and benefit information between competitive employers. Probably the two most noted cases are United States v. Utah Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (1994) and Todd v. Exxon Corp. (2001). While these cases dealt with specific industries, most attorneys practicing in the area of labor relations and antitrust look to these cases for guidance regardless of the industry.

The Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice have issued a statement setting forth an antitrust “safety zone” for health care providers who participate in written surveys.   They will not be considered to be in violation of antitrust laws if the following conditions are satisfied:

– The survey is managed by a third party;

– The information provided by survey participants is based on data more than three months old; and

– There are at least five providers reporting data upon which a disseminated statistic is based, no individual provider’s data represents more than 25% on a weighted basis of that statistic and any information disseminated is sufficiently aggregated so that it does not allow recipients to identify the compensation paid by any particular provider.

This statement gives guidance specifically to the health care industry.  To date, there is not such a case that has been brought in the hotel industry. Although, with the recent surge of labor organization activity going on across the country, our industry should continue to be cautious with regard to how wage and benefit information is shared with competitors.

In our next post, we will discuss precautions to minimize risk if you intend to share wage and benefit information with a competitor.

WageWatch surveys over 5,000 hotels, resorts and casino properties in the United States and the Caribbean. It was the first to leverage the power of the Internet to create the first of its kind, web-based wage and benefits survey tool in 2000.  WageWatch’s proprietary survey process enables human resources professionals to access the most up-to-date and accurate wage and benefits data and prepare custom reports based on their needs and requirements. For more information, please contact WageWatch at 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

 

Posted in Regulatory & Legal Updates on August 29th, 2012 · Comments Off on How to Avoid Antitrust Claims When Conducting Wage Surveys: Part 1