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Posts Tagged “merit pay program”

COMPENSABLE TIME

Employers need to ensure they count all worked hours as paid hours for their non-exempt staff. For example, when an employee eats lunch at their workstation or desk and their lunch is interrupted by work such as answering phones or email, the employee is working and must be paid for that time because the employee has not been completely relieved from duty.

If the employer has a policy that is expressly and clearly communicated to the employee regarding a specific length of time for a break, any unauthorized extensions of that break time do not need to be counted as hours worked.  Bona fide meal periods (typically 30 minutes or more) generally need not be compensated as work time. However, the employee must be completely relieved from duty for the purpose of eating regular meals.

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), doesn’t require employers to provide meal or rest breaks, though some states do require such breaks and the rules can also be different for younger workers.  You can find a list of state meal and rest break laws at the Department of Labor’s website at  http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/meal.htm and  http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/rest.htm.

Employers that fall under the federal guidelines do not have to pay for meal or rest breaks unless:

  • The employee works through or during their break, or
  • The break lasts 20 minutes or less, or
  • The break is interrupted by work

Some other compensable time under the federal rules can include waiting time, on-call time, attendance at meetings and training programs, travel time and performing work outside of work hours such as checking emails.

Waiting time may or may not be hours worked depending upon the circumstances.  If an employee needs to wait before a duty can start such as a firefighter waiting for an alarm, then the employee is ‘engaged to wait’ and this time is worked time and must be paid.

On-Call Time is paid time if the employee is required to remain on the employer’s premises.   In most cases the on-call time does not have to be paid when an employee is not required to remain on the employer’s premises.   However additional requirements put on the on-call time that further limits the employee’s freedom could require the time to be compensated.

Attendance at meetings or training programs is paid time when any of the following conditions are true:

  • It is during normal hours,
  • It is mandatory,
    • If the employee feels that they should or need to attend, then it is mandatory
    • It is job related

Travel time may be paid time or not depending upon the kind of travel involved.  Regular commute time to and from the work site is not paid time.  When the employee works at a different work site location then any commute time that is greater than the employee’s regular commute time to their usual work site needs to be counted as paid time.

Travel that is part of the regular work duties, such as travel from job site to job site during the workday, is work time and must be counted as hours worked.  Overnight travel is work time and must be paid time

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives and that your pay practices are fair, equitable and non-discriminatory. We can provide your business with compensation surveys and salary reports to help you establish a budget for your merit pay program, including bonuses and incentives. Our innovative company is a leader in the collection of data for surveys and salary reports, which allows us to provide services to a wide range of industries in both the private and public sector. To learn more about our compensation surveys, salary reports and other services, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

Posted in Uncategorized on July 21st, 2016 · Comments Off on COMPENSABLE TIME

BLENDED OVERTIME RATE IN HOSPITALITY

HR knows that employers must pay an overtime premium of 1.5 times base pay to non-exempt employees who work in excess of 40 hours in a workweek. This calculation is complicated in the hospitality industry due to the use of the common utilization of the tip credit to the federal minimum wage and prevalence of multi-job employees.

Many hoteliers have employees that operate in two or more job functions. This could an employee who is a housekeeper during the first shift and a maintenance technician in the second shift, for example. In the hospitality industry, all hours worked for the same employer, which is defined as the management company and not simply the specific hotel property, must be added together to determine if total hours work exceed 40 hours in the workweek.

If the base rates of the two or more jobs are the same, the overtime calculation is straight forward it is simply 1.5 times the base rate. If the base rates of the two or more jobs are different, then the employer needs to blend the base rates to recreate a new regular rate of play before applying the 1.5 overtime multiplier.

Here is an example of calculating the blended overtime rate for an employee who works in two jobs at two different hourly rates.

Job 1: Housekeeper: $12.50 per hour

Job 2: Maintenance Tech: $16.50 per hour

For the week in question, this employee worked 25 hours as a housekeeper and 20 hours as a Maintenance Tech. With 45 total hours in the week, this employee is eligible for 5 hours of overtime premium pay. What question is how do we calculate the blended regular rate of pay and arrive at the weekly total earnings?

Housekeeper  = $12.50/hr x 25 Hours = $312.50 straight-time earnings

Maintenance Tech  = $16.50/hr x 20 Hours = $330.00 straight-time earnings

$312.50 + $330.00 = $642.50 total straight-time earnings

$642.50 total earnings / 45 hours for the week = $14.28 blended regular rate of pay

Remember, the straight-time earnings have already been calculated for all hours worked, so the additional amount to be calculated for each overtime hour worked is one –half the regular rate.

$14.28 regular rate x 0.5 half x 5 overtime hours  = $35.70 additional half-time pay

Adding the straight-time earnings with the additional half-time pay comes out to our total pay with overtime premium.

$642.50 + $35.70 = 678.20 total pay with overtime

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives and that your pay practices are fair, equitable and non-discriminatory. We can provide your business with compensation surveys and salary reports to help you establish a budget for your merit pay program, including bonuses and incentives. Our innovative company is a leader in the collection of data for surveys and salary reports, which allows us to provide services to a wide range of industries in both the private and public sector. To learn more about our compensation surveys, salary reports and other services, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

Posted in Uncategorized on March 10th, 2016 · Comments Off on BLENDED OVERTIME RATE IN HOSPITALITY

ALLOCATION OF MERIT INCREASES

A primary goal of any compensation program is to motivate employees to perform their best.  Most organizations have pay for performance at least in the form of a merit pay system.  An accurate, reliable and credible performance-appraisal program that is aligned with company goals, core values and industry best practices is the foundation of a successful merit pay program.   Performance measures should be tailored specifically for the organization and it’s jobs with clear outcomes that minimize bias and misinterpretation.   Consistency, manager training, effective communications and a periodic review are also essential for success.  

The merit pay budget has two aspects to it, determining the size of the budget and allocating the budget to organizational units and it’s employees.  Determining the size of the budget will be based on competitive trends, the organization’s financial situation and other factors that may impact pay such as minimum wage and cost of living changes.  For the past several years merit budgets have been small and therefore it has been a challenge to adequately rewarding top performers as well as those that are rated ‘Good’ and ‘Average’.  Employees with performance ratings of Good and Average can be the largest percentage of employees and therefore the backbone of the workforce.   These employees should not be overlooked but raises for these employees often do not keep up with the cost of living.  Also the differentials between performance levels may not be large enough to motivate and retain employees.   These factors reduce the motivational potential of the merit pay program. 

Using a merit increase matrix may help to maintain internal equity but may not properly reward top performers.  You want your reviewing managers to be engaged in the merit award process and to give appropriate thought and consideration to their pay decisions.  A certain amount of guidance and training is needed but the merit matrix can be too structured and rigid as well as make it too easy for reviewing managers to simply follow the formula rather than spend the time and effort for a thorough review.  Greater rewards for top performers and greater deviation of awards between good and average performers can be accomplished by providing zero increases to employees whose performance falls below average.  Providing broad increase guidelines in lieu of a matrix to your reviewing managers using factors such as performance rating, time in position, and position in salary range can eliminate the rigidity of the merit matrix and drive a a more thoughtful approach to the merit award process.  Once tentative award amounts are determined, reviewing managers should perform an analysis of the awards looking at the whole department and at each individual award using these and other factors as well as any unique or special circumstances. 

Annual pay increases not only help keep employees’ pay at market, providing awards that are accurately linked to performance are important in retaining employees – especially your best ones.  Compensation frequently emerges as a driver of retention, and when pay increases aren’t provided regularly and fairly, it will negatively impact job satisfaction.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives and that your pay practices are fair, equitable and non-discriminatory. We can provide your business with compensation surveys and salary reports to help you establish a budget for your merit pay program, including bonuses and incentives. Our innovative company is a leader in the collection of data for surveys and salary reports, which allows us to provide services to a wide range of industries in both the private and public sector. To learn more about our compensation surveys, salary reports and other services, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

Posted in Uncategorized on January 14th, 2015 · Comments Off on ALLOCATION OF MERIT INCREASES