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Posts Tagged “healthcare compensation data”

COMPENSABLE TIME

Employers need to ensure they count all worked hours as paid hours for their non-exempt staff. For example, when an employee eats lunch at their workstation or desk and their lunch is interrupted by work such as answering phones or email, the employee is working and must be paid for that time because the employee has not been completely relieved from duty.

If the employer has a policy that is expressly and clearly communicated to the employee regarding a specific length of time for a break, any unauthorized extensions of that break time do not need to be counted as hours worked. Bona fide meal periods (typically 30 minutes or more) generally need not be compensated as work time. However, the employee must be completely relieved from duty for the purpose of eating regular meals.

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), doesn’t require employers to provide meal or rest breaks, though some states do require such breaks and the rules can also be different for younger workers. You can find a list of state meal and rest break laws at the Department of Labor’s website at http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/meal.htm and http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/rest.htm.

Employers that fall under the federal guidelines do not have to pay for meal or rest breaks unless:
• The employee works through or during their break
• The break lasts 20 minutes or less
• The break is interrupted by work

Some other compensable time under the federal rules can include waiting time, on-call time, attendance at meetings and training programs, travel time and performing work outside of work hours such as checking emails.

Waiting time may or may not be hours worked depending on the circumstances. If an employee needs to wait before a duty can start such as a firefighter waiting for an alarm, then the employee is ‘engaged to wait’ and this time is worked time and must be paid.

On-Call Time is paid time if the employee is required to remain on the employer’s premises. In most cases, the on-call time does not have to be paid when an employee is not required to remain on the employer’s premises. However additional requirements put on the on-call time that further limits the employee’s freedom could require the time to be compensated.

Attendance at meetings or training programs is paid time when any of the following conditions are true:
• It is during normal work hours
• It is mandatory (if the employee feels that they should or need to attend, then it is mandatory)
• It is job-related

Travel time may be paid time or not depending upon the kind of travel involved. Regular commute time to and from the work site is not paid time. When the employee works at a different work site location then any commute time that is greater than the employee’s regular commute time to their usual work site needs to be counted as paid time. Travel that is part of the regular work duties, such as travel from job site to job site during the workday, is work time and must be counted as hours worked. Overnight travel is work time and must be paid time.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives and that your pay practices are fair, equitable and non-discriminatory. We can provide your business with compensation surveys and salary reports to help you establish a budget for your merit pay program, including bonuses and incentives. Our innovative company is a leader in the collection of data for surveys and salary reports, which allows us to provide services to a wide range of industries in both the private and public sector. To learn more about our compensation surveys, salary reports, and other services, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

Best Practices for Performance Review

One of the greatest challenges for companies in regards to their employees is the performance review process. Employees are evaluated on their performance of assigned job responsibilities, receiving feedback on areas they are doing well in as well as any areas that may need improvement. Reviews are used as a key component for career development, encouraging employees to work harder, reach higher and set attainable goals for the future.

Performance reviews can be a very helpful tool for both the business and the employee when done properly. A major problem with performance reviews is that often times they don’t accomplish what they set out to, leading to stress for both the employee and the employer. It may be difficult to know how to go about overhauling or tweaking your performance review process.

When giving a performance review, you must consider what your organization seeks to accomplish by completing the process. The following are a few of the best practices in regards to achieving beneficial performance reviews:

  • Employee performance reviews must be tied to business objectives. If your employees are consistently receiving high performance scores, but the business is not meeting its goals, then you may need to tweak your process.
  • Plan review performance dates strategically. As listed above, performance reviews should be tied to business objectives; therefore, you should align the performance review schedule with the company’s annual cycle instead of an irrelevant date, such as the anniversary of employment. Employees can be better evaluated after reviewing how the business as a whole performed during the fiscal calendar year.
  • Remember that the review process is always about the employee. As an employer, you must be direct in providing feedback. Be completely open and honest. Employees need to understand what they are doing well and what they can improve upon in order to set personal goals. There should be no question as to what is expected of them before their next performance review.
  • Performance review forms should only be used for a maximum of five years. Businesses are constantly changing and evolving, so it only makes sense for the performance review form to evolve too in order to achieve maximum efficiency.

If you would like to develop a more effective performance review process, consider the expert services of WageWatch. Using performance review data, we can help you to establish a budget for your company through the use of salaries surveys, compensation surveys and other data. With over a decade of experience working with industry associations and employer groups, we have the expertise to provide your business with online benefit, wage and compensation surveys. To learn more about how WageWatch can help you, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

Posted in Benefits & Compensation on December 27th, 2012 · Comments Off on Best Practices for Performance Review

The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Business

The Affordable Care Act is already causing much confusion for American companies as well as for the general public. The law, as passed, was over 2,500 pages long and will require thousands of additional pages of regulatory policy in order to be enacted.  As we enter the year 2013, there will be many more changes to healthcare as the new law and the regulatory policies surrounding it take effect. As the provider of employee benefits, business owners need to fully understand the impact that the Affordable Care Act will have on their business and their employees over the next few years.

The professionals at WageWatch would like to share the following refresher on some of the most important policies within the Affordable Care Act:

1. Small business owners will receive a tax credit on their contribution to employee insurance policies. For businesses with less than 10 employees, each with average wages under $25,000, they will receive a 50 percent tax credit on their contribution. These tax credits apply to all small businesses up to 50 employees with average wages of $50,000, although the credit is reduced on a sliding scale depending on the businesses size and average salary.

2. Beginning in the year 2018, the Affordable Care Act will impose a 35 percent tax on employer provided health insurance plans that exceed $10,200 for individual coverage and $27,500 for coverage of a family. The idea behind this policy is that business owners will aim to avoid expensive insurance policies known as Cadillac Plans, and insurance companies will be forced to modify coverage with an eye to keeping costs down.

3. If you are a small business with 51 or more full time employees, you will be fined $2,000 per employee, excluding the first 30 employees, if you do not offer insurance for employees that work an average of 30 or more hours each week.  For small businesses with 50 or fewer employees, there is no penalty. Small businesses of all sizes are also not required to provide insurance for part-time employees.

4. Business owners must offer insurance that is certified affordable to employees. The premium for each employee’s plan cannot exceed 9.5 percent of their total household income. If the insurance coverage doesn’t meet the affordability law, employees should be offered tax credits to purchase insurance on their own. Business owners will then have to pay whichever is less: $3,000 per employee that receives the credit or $2,000 per employee, excluding the first 30 workers.

5. Businesses with less than 100 employees that work an average of 25 or more hours per week are eligible for grants to start wellness programs. These programs encourage employees to take control of their health by living more healthy lifestyles, which helps to prevent harmful health conditions down the road.

It is clear from just the five points above, that much is still to be determined before implementation can take effect. Please stay tuned as we will continue to provide you with updates on ACA as more information becomes available.

The experts at WageWatch want you to know how important it is to be aware of the new policies under the Affordable Care Act and their effect on small businesses. Employers need to properly plan for the future by developing accurate budgets that take the changing costs of healthcare benefits into consideration for the year 2013 and beyond. For assistance with your budget, WageWatch offers cost-effective reports, including salary, wages and benefits survey data. To learn more about the services provided by WageWatch, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

 

Posted in Regulatory & Legal Updates on December 12th, 2012 · Comments Off on The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Business