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ARE YOU ATTRACTING TOP TALENT?

Attracting Talent

Many business owners find it to be a huge challenge to attract and retain a group of talented and hardworking employees that are loyal to the company and its mission.  Finding high caliber employees with advanced skills to complete important jobs within a company is a challenge that not only exists in today’s marketplace but one that business owners have had to navigate for years.  Everyone is looking for top talent, and those companies that excel in attracting and retaining this talent are the ones that will reap the rewards.  In addition to a number of other factors, businesses that best retain employees offer great compensation and benefits packages.

To retain talent, it is essential that loyalty is established.  In order to do this, the employee must feel that their job is instrumental in achieving the goals of the company, making them excited to come into work each day.  It is also important that the work the employee puts in is acknowledged, affirming their place within the company, and offering them opportunities for growth.

While compensation and benefits packages are one of the largest factors considered by employees, it isn’t enough to make top talent to stay. The following are a few ways that you can attract and retain the best employees at your company:

  • Promote open communication.  When a company is completely open with employees, everyone will feel respected.  Instead of allowing rumors to spread, let your employees know as soon as possible about anything that is going on in regards to the company.   When possible, let your employees be a part of the decision making process.  A culture of open communication is very attractive to employees.
  • Provide opportunities for team building.  Most employees enjoy interacting with their coworkers. By encouraging teamwork, employees are able to build great working relationships and establish a trusting, open environment for the company.  When working together toward a common goal, employees are more motivated and excited about their jobs, often producing excellent results.
  • Cater to individual work style.  Each employee has a different way that they prefer to work, learn and be managed.  When you as an employer take the time and effort to make adjustments for each employee’s needs, they will respect the company more and loyalty will, once again, be built.  This will also help you to establish teams that will work best together based on their work styles.
  • Acknowledge your talent.  When an employee does a good job, it is important that you recognize them for their efforts, so they feel that they are a valued member of the team.  A majority of employees leaving a company do so because they feel unappreciated.  Employees want to feel that the work they are doing is making a difference, so acknowledging their work often is essential.  Also, review surveys for 2013 healthcare compensation, 2013 casino compensation and other market compensation data surveys for your industry to determine what benefits and bonuses you should be rewarding your employees with.

Implementing the above suggestions will help your company to build a culture that encourages the retention of employees, which in turn will attract top talent.  In addition to providing a great work environment that respects employees and provides opportunities for learning and growth, it is also important that they receive a solid benefits package.  At WageWatch, we provide accurate data for hospitality compensation, healthcare compensation, casino compensation, and compensation information for a wide variety of other industries.  To learn more about our up-to-date market compensation surveys, call 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

ASKING ABOUT SALARY HISTORY COULD SOON BE ILLEGAL

Banned-Sal Hist-B

Employers have asked salary-based questions as one method of gaining an accurate picture of an applicant’s qualifications for a position.  Federal laws do not prohibit requesting the information, however, there is a growing trend for some states or cities and counties to outlaw employers from requesting salary history.  Last February 2018, we published a blog focused on the states that have banned salary-based questions from job applicants; the trend to ban these questions has greatly increased and Congress continues to explore the ban on salary questions.  This post updates action taken over the past year.

With the objective of pushing to fight wage discrimination and the gender pay gap, a bill was recently introduced (February 2019) in Congress that would ban salary questions across ALL states.  The proposed Paycheck Fairness Act would prohibit employers nationwide from asking job applicants about their salary history and require employers to prove that pay disparities between men and women are job-related. The bill forces employers to develop salary offers based on job requirements and market pay levels rather than an applicant’s current salary or salary history, which may be lower than current market rates for some individuals’ skill and experience.  The proposed legislation would strengthen the Equal Pay Act.

The following states and cities or counties have banned salary questions by public and/or private employers:

STATE

CITY  COUNTY EFFECTIVE DATE

DETAILS

California State-Wide JAN 2018 All employers, including state and local government
Connecticut State-Wide JAN 2019 All employers
Delaware State-Wide DEC 2017 All employers, or an employer’s agent
Georgia Atlanta FEB 2019 City agencies
Hawaii State-Wide JAN 2019 All employers, employment agencies
Illinois State-Wide JAN 2019 State Agencies
Chicago APR 2018 City departments
Kentucky Louisville MAY 2018 Louisville/Jefferson County Metro Gov; City Agencies
Louisiana New Orleans JAN 2017 City agencies
Massachusetts State-Wide JUL 2018 All employers, state & municipal employers
Michigan State-Wide JAN 2019 State department & certain autonomous agencies
Missouri Kansas City JUL 2018 City may not ask applicants for pay history until they reach an agreed-upon salary
New Jersey State-Wide FEB 2018 State entities
New York State-Wide JAN 2017 State agencies and departments

New York City OCT 2017 All employers, agencies or employees or agents

Albany County DEC 2017 All employers and employment agencies

Suffolk County JUN 2019 Employers and employment agencies

Westchester County JUL 2018 Employers, labor organizations, employment agencies, or licensing agencies
Oregon State-Wide OCT 2017 All employers
Pennsylvania State-Wide SEP 2018 State agencies

Philadelphia TBD All employers

Pittsburgh JAN 2017 City’s agencies and offices
Puerto Rico Commonwealth MAR 2018 All employers

When an employer ceases to rely on salary history of an applicant, it requires making a clear, market-based case for pay, the challenge falls on the employer.  It will be important to create a salary range for each position and ensure that the variations within those ranges are based on things like merit, education, and experience.  Some companies welcome a strictly market-based approach to making salary offers as it has the ability to foster greater transparency.  Whether or not your jurisdiction is covered by the new laws, the trend is increasing and may soon impact your organization.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times.  This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.  For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

HUMAN RESOURCES ROLE IN INNOVATION

How can human resources contribute to innovation?  How can we turn new ideas into reality, break old paradigms, and step outside of the box with new solutions to old problems?  Innovation may begin with creativity but it is more than an idea — it takes place when great ideas come to fruition and make their mark in the world.  In the past, most businesses focused on continuous improvement of their products and services to maintain a competitive edge.  But in today’s economy, that’s not always enough.

As Human Resource professionals, we are fortunate to be responsible for many areas of an organization that can directly impact and contributes to innovation; including recruitment, performance management, recognition, rewards, training, and employee engagement.  Human Resources can also play a key role in creating an organizational structure and overall culture that fosters and supports innovation.

Recruiting can focus on hiring for innovation by identifying people who can “think outside the box” or have skills and capabilities that lend toward innovation.  Performance management can serve as a valuable tool in the creation of a sustainable culture of innovation.  Performance measures can give consideration as to whether or not employees are given the time and resources to experiment, generate and explore ideas, and make presentations to management.  Rewards can be used to reinforce the importance of innovation and recognition can be used to encourage and inspire employees to innovate and share ideas.  HR’s role in organizational design provides huge potential for enabling innovation.  For example, organizational design can be used to facilitate easier exchange of employees’ ideas across boundaries and functions.

An example of a human resource is driven innovation that used an out-of-the-box idea to improve the recruiting process is La Cantera Resort in San Antonio, TX, A Destination Hotel, they have incorporated an idea made popular by Disney, the Fast PASS.  In Disney’s version, guests can avoid the line and use a Fast PASS to get a ticket to ride an attraction at a specified time with limited to no waiting.  This helps improve the guest experience, improves wait times, improves communication and enhances the ability to meet the expectation of guests.  At Destination Hotels, they have incorporated this concept into their recruitment practices.  Special “FAST PASS” cards are given to managers who can spot people in their daily interactions (at grocery stores, restaurants, bars, the mall, etc.) providing exceptional customer service and invite them to consider an employment opening/opportunity with Destination.  They can call a specific number and get a “prioritized/guaranteed” in-person interview as opposed to filling out an application during certain hours and hoping for a chance to be considered.  Like Disney, the approach at Destination Hotels improves the experience for the candidate and the HR function/hiring managers.  It speeds up the ability to source the most qualified talent and create a match to open position needs at the resort. Destination competes on innovation.

While HR can have a significant impact on many of the key drivers of innovation, it is a collaborative process and requires many areas to come together in order to succeed.  Executive leaders hold the key to the level and success of innovation in their organization.  They control the strategic direction, influence the culture, and directly and indirectly control all organizational practices.   Managers must know how to lead innovative teams, and individuals must know how to apply innovative thinking.  Every department or function must be part of the process.  For example, Information Technology has become an enabler of innovative ideas, but it is also often the starting point for innovative products or services and Finance has a unique opportunity through the budget development to add innovation either as a line in the overall budget or as a percentage of every departmental budget.

Organizations need to develop practices that make it easier to innovate.  For example, at the core of an organization’s culture should be an acceptance of the need to experiment and understand that this comes with the risk of failure and that failure needs to be seen as a learning experience and an important step in the process.  Culture is definitely key to sustainable innovation.  The mindset and culture of the HR team have an exponential impact and influence on the entire organization.  HR leaders can help enable their organizations to differentiate themselves by understanding the critical importance of innovation today and how their role can contribute by attracting and keeping the most innovative people, constantly improving their skills and creating and enabling a culture of innovation.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.  For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

AUTOMATION OF THE HOTEL EXPERIENCE IS THE FUTURE

(Note:  The following article was published in the June 7, 2017, Hotel News Now magazine; it was written by Randy Pullen, the founder and current CEO/President of WageWatch.)

Artificial intelligence and robots are here, and increasingly will be able to do much of the work in hotels. Coming to terms with that can help manage fears and uncertainty.

Hotels are on the edge of a new era driven by automation, artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics. Of course, I am not the first one to say this as there are many published articles extolling the virtues and sins of automation in the workplace and AI technology in the hotel industry.

Automation of guest messaging, mobile check-in and check-out, room assignments, motion detection, mobile key cards and facial recognition are already in service in many hotels around the world, and this is just the beginning.

A futuristic view is provided by Hideo Sawada, president of Sawada Holdings Co., which built the Henn na Hotel in Japan—Henn na is Japanese for “weird,” so this is the “Weird Hotel”—as a futuristic hotel and as a novelty add-on to an existing amusement park. The Weird Hotel is an automated limited service hotel, in operation though it has a few glitches that need to be worked out. Interestingly, it is not that highly rated by guests, but they keep coming to experience the future.

Tractica, a market intelligence firm focused on AI and robotics, forecasts global robotics market revenues to grow from $28 billion in 2015 to $151 billion a year by 2020. They predict the majority of the growth will come from “non-industrial” robots.

Tractica’s forecast does not include the future growth of AI and its impact on robotics. When you add AI to robotics what you end up with is a friendly robot that can learn and adapt to changes in the workplace. Both PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company have researched and written several white papers on the rapid advancement of AI and automation, and their coming impact on the workplace. In a study issued in March, PricewaterhouseCoopers estimated 38% of jobs in the U.S. would be automated by the early 2030s. For the accommodations and food service sector, they estimated that 25% of jobs would be automated.

While 25% of the jobs in the accommodations and food service sector amounts to more than 3.3 million jobs being automated, this is low when compared to other studies. A report issued by McKinsey & Company in July 2016 calculated that, of all industrial sectors, the potential for automation is the highest in accommodations and food service. According to that analysis, 73% of the activities performed by workers in accommodations and food service have the potential for automation. Essentially, up to almost half of the jobs in hotels and restaurants could be automated in the next decade and a half.

Both studies likely underestimate how rapidly AI and automation will transform the workplace and our personal lives. It is not possible to predict with accuracy the speed with which new technologies will advance. Disruptive technologies such as desktop computers and smartphones changed the workplace and our personal lives much faster than predicted when first introduced into the marketplace. I predict the assimilation of AI and automation into our lives will happen much quicker in what is now being called the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Klaus Schwab, executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, stated in his address to the Forum in January 2016: “We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work and relate to one another.” He goes on to say, “This will give rise to a job market increasingly segregated into ‘low-skill/low-pay’ and ‘high-skill/high-pay’ segments, which in turn will lead to an increase in social tensions.” I believe his is a linear projection of the future, not taking into consideration how human beings rapidly adapt to a changing environment.

As we have already seen, it is not just low-skill/low-pay jobs that are impacted by AI. Wall Street is going through a transition as financial advisors are being replaced by software programs with algorithms that make reliable, profitable investment decisions faster and with more accountability than humans. Speaking of accountability (note, I am a CPA), much of what accountants do is very susceptible to automation—audits, inventory tracking, supply chain automation and tax returns, just to name a few.

Hotels have already automated or are in the process of automating repetitive tasks for personal and work activities, and the rate of adoption is accelerating at a pace that was unimaginable just a few years ago. For the hospitality industry, all levels of the business—including the front of house, back of house and administration—are susceptible to automation in total or in part. Automation and AI are and will become the driving forces in the lodging industry, as management companies and team members learn to adapt and apply the new technology to improving the guest experience at their hotels.

As automation and robots with AI become the 800-pound gorilla in the workplace, the uncertainty of what people will do if their jobs disappear is always a fear. No doubt there will be a shift in jobs; however, new conditions create new opportunities. During the first Industrial Revolution, as people moved from the farms to the cities to work in factories, there was much turmoil; but in the long-term, the outcome was good as more jobs were created than lost. People learn to adapt to change and move from the old to the new as their expectations for the future change. We only need to look to our children to see the future. Kids say the future of tech is robots.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs and help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

BUDGET SEASON: ARE YOU PREPARED?

It’s that time of year again when companies are preparing their budgets for the upcoming year.   For HR professionals, it is probably not one of your favorite tasks, but by embracing the process, it can be an opportunity to reinforce the HR function as a strategic partner.

Budgets are used to monitor progress toward goals, help control spending, and predict cash flow and profit.  The challenge is predicting the future 100% accurately and in turn developing effective budgets.

It is valuable for HR to gain a strong understanding and appreciation for the value of good annual budgeting.  In most companies, employee costs constitute the majority of fixed costs and therefore the HR budget contains key and critical elements of the overall company budget.

Here are a few things you can do to make the budget process a smoother one:

  1. Throughout the year, ensure to include the CFO when reviewing such things as pay increases with the CEO.  This can go a long way to developing a partnership with the CFO.
  2. The credibility of the HR function is significantly improved when you can demonstrate real savings and value for HR projects and processes.
  3. Empower your HR team.  Every HR team member should own their line items in the budget.  For example, recruiting is responsible for their search firm fees, recruiting tools, and relocation.
  4. Link the development of your budget to corporate strategy.  This gives a clearer understanding of strategic goals.  And, in turn, should create greater support for the goals, and, a stronger company-wide performance. The key to linking the two is communication.  In order to communicate strategic goals, top management needs information about customers, competitors, technology, etc., and this information must come from support units such as Human Resources.
Budgeting requires the collection of many forms of data. From a human resource   perspective, listed below are some items that would be included in the budget:

Recruiting

  • Advertising & agency fees
  • Employee referral program
  • Background checks / drug testing
  • Recruitment expenses
  • Applicant tracking system costs

Training

  • Training programs
  • Travel expenses
  • Consulting fees

Compensation and Benefits

  • Payroll costs
  • Salaries  & overtime
  • Compensation surveys / benefit surveys
  • Incentive compensation
  • Health and welfare benefits
  • Retirement plan
  • Employee assistance program

Employee and Labor Relations

  • Recognition program  / Service Awards
  • Employee Opinion Survey
  • Performance appraisal software
  • Employment and Labor relations expenses (attorneys, consultants)

Other

  • Strategic planning (data/consultants)
  • HR databases such as HRIS/subscriptions/memberships/books

At WageWatch our compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs and help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary surveys that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online .

ANSWERS TO ADA ISSUES QUIZ!

Day in and day out, we at Pautsch Spognardi & Baiochhi Legal Group get more questions about disability discrimination and accommodation than any other law.  Listed below are the questions AND answers!

  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act and state laws providing protections against disability discrimination cover employers with 15 or more employees, and not those with less.

    False: Many states have laws protecting individuals with disabilities working or applying for jobs at companies that employ as few as one (1) employee. Illinois and Wisconsin are among these states.

  2. So long as you treat an employee who is an individual with a disability the same as all other employees you will comply with the requirements of ADA.

    False: It is true that individuals with a disability are entitled to treatment equal to that which you give non-disabled employees.  But, you are also required by ADA to afford these individuals with disabilities reasonable accommodations that allow them to perform essential functions of their job.

  3. ADA and state discrimination laws against disability discrimination require equal treatment between employees with disabilities and those employees that do not have disabilities.

    True:  It is true that this is required.  But as noted in the answer to question #2, more is required—reasonable accommodation.

  4. Depressive disorder is a covered disability under ADA.

    True and False: It all depends on whether the condition of the employee or applicant is such that it meets the definition of a “qualified individual with a disability” under ADAAA or applicable.  In other words, does the physical or mental condition substantially limit the employee or applicant in a major life activity such as walking, seeing, talking, working, etc., or does the employee or applicant have a record of such impairment, or is the employee perceived as having such a condition?  This is often a difficult analysis that must be made based on the individualized circumstances of that individual’s condition.  So, some cases of cancer will be determined to be a disability, and some will not.

  5. An employee who suffers a compound fracture of their tibia and fully recovers from this injury and receives a full release for work in four months’ time is likely covered by ADA due to this condition.

    False: Under the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008, Congress set six months as the minimum time for coverage as a disability protected by the law.  Beware, however, of terminating an employee based on this premise and law.  It is particularly risky to terminate an employee based on the assumption that the disability won’t last more than six months, when it may.

  6. An employee who suffers an Achilles tear in her left foot and is fully released for a return to work after exactly one year is covered under ADA.

    Probably True: Given the length of time involved, see the answer to question 5 above; it is likely that this condition is covered.

  7. An employee whose only physical limitation on her medical release for work is a 15-pound lifting restriction is not covered by ADA.

    Probably False: If this release is permanent, then almost certainly the employee is covered because this has been held by many courts and agency’s to be a substantial limitation on the major life activity of lifting.

  8. An employee whose only physical limitation on his medical release for work is a 50-pound lifting restriction is not covered by ADA.

    True: Many cases have decided that this sort of condition is not a covered disability because it does not “substantially limit” a major life activity.  In other words, the employee is still a pretty good lifter.

  9. Migraine headaches are not a covered disability under ADA.

    True and False: For all of the same reasons noted above with respect to “cancer”, some cases of migraine headaches are covered, while others are not.

  10. The definition that sets forth the requirements for qualifying as an “individual with a disability under ADA” is essentially the same as that defining a “serious health condition” under the FMLA.

    False:  The two definitions are vastly different.  FMLA’s definition focuses on the need for continuing medical treatment and in-patient hospitalization while ADA’s definition is, as noted above, far more focused on the length and the long-term severity of the condition.

As you can see from these answers, ADA, and the state disability, discrimination laws are difficult laws to interpret and apply to the facts and conditions that occur and are present in your workplace.  The definition of who is a qualified individual with a disability is a particularly knotty one.  The Supreme Court has tackled this definition many times and Congress reversed a number of these decisions in passing the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008.
Pautsch Spognardi & Baiocchi Legal Group, LLP; http://www.psb-attorneys.com/ Office: 414-223-5743

 

DRAMATIC CHANGES FOR PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

Organizations are exploring some new and innovative performance management systems in an effort to truly inspire and motivate their teams with some encouraging results. Traditional performance management systems typically set goals related to the business plan, utilize performance appraisals that are too lengthy, redundant, hastily completed to meet deadlines, and often don’t allow employees any real input.  Many HR leaders believe that performance reviews yield inaccurate results due to biased approaches and misleading inputs.  Performance Appraisals are essentially a forced ranking system that can actually be very demotivating.

The traditional systems are beginning to shift to a more effective coaching system that focuses on employee achievement of measurable goals and objectives rather than formalized annual appraisal systems that primarily communicate one-way.  There are many examples of progressive companies that have replaced their traditional performance management systems with a culture of coaching, feedback, development, and high performance. Critical to success is that everyone in a leadership role is trained on how to coach and provide constant performance feedback, which in turn, engages employees and creates a desire to continuously improve.

The goal of managing performance is being replaced with a goal of obtaining the best possible sustainable performance under the current circumstances.   Key elements of this new paradigm include:

  • Simplify the Process:  Train managers on how to coach, give feedback and regularly check in with employees.  Focus on developing employees rather than evaluating and giving them a ‘rating’.  Ask questions that help target what the employee needs, such as, “What skills would you most like to improve on?” or “What can I do to help you?” Review employee progress more frequently making the process less intimidating and more sensitive.
  • Streamline, shorten or completely replace Performance Review forms:  Replace the forms with on-going coaching and feedback.  Feedback must be timely to be meaningful.
  • More agile, relevant, frequent and transparent goal management:  Include employees in the discussion of key performance objectives, ensuring they understand the reasons for the goals and can see how they are linked to organizational goals.  Utilize more short term goals that are easier for employees to derive meaning from what they do every day.  Create achievable goals and regularly monitor employee progress.
  • Address career goals and future training needs:  Include a system that supports follow-up and delivery of the training and career opportunities.  Create a culture where managers can delegate without feeling threatened, knowing they also have opportunity and training for the next career advancement.
  • Eliminate direct correlation between performance rating and compensation:  Make pay adjustments based on a combination of elements such as performance, customer and business impact, skill scarcity and the competitive nature of employees’ positions.

Employees want to perform at their best.  They want to understand the goals and to be motivated.  They want to contribute, be supported, to learn and to have fun.  Management and leaders need to create the conditions needed for a great performance to take place and for business to flourish.  The ideal process for managing performance is one that successfully motivates and supports staff to contribute to the achievement of the goals and objectives of the organization.  A culture that encourages on-going communication and coaching between managers and their employees has many benefits and advantages over traditional Performance Management.

Change can be challenging and demanding.  At WageWatch our compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs and help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary surveys that will allow you to stay current with the times.  This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards.  For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data, and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

ARE YOU ATTRACTING TOP TALENT?

Many business owners find it to be a huge challenge to attract and retain a group of talented and hardworking employees that are loyal to the company and its mission. Finding high caliber employees with advanced skills to complete important jobs within a company is a challenge that not only exists in today’s marketplace but one that business owners have had to navigate for many years. Everyone is looking for top talent, and those companies that excel in attracting and retaining this talent are the ones that will reap the rewards. In addition to a number of other factors, businesses that retain the best employees offer great compensation and benefits packages.

To retain talent, it is essential that loyalty is established. In order to do this, the employee must feel that their job is instrumental in achieving the goals of the company, making them excited to come into work each day and give it their all. It is also important that the work the employee accomplishes is acknowledged, affirming their place within the company, and offering them opportunities for growth.

While compensation and benefits packages are one of the largest factors considered by employees, it isn’t enough to make the top talent stay. The following are a few ways that you can attract and retain the best employees at your company:

  • Promote open communication. When a company is completely open with employees, everyone will feel respected. Instead of allowing rumors to spread, let your employees know as soon as possible about anything that is going on in regards to the company. When possible, let your employees be a part of the decision-making process. A culture of open communication is very attractive to employees.
  • Provide opportunities for team building. Most employees enjoy interacting with their coworkers. By encouraging teamwork, employees are able to build great working relationships and establish a trusting, open environment for the company. When working together toward a common goal, employees are more motivated and excited about their jobs, often producing excellent results.
  • Cater to individual work style. Each employee has a different way that they prefer to work, learn and be managed. When you as an employer take the time and effort to make adjustments for each employee’s needs, they will respect the company more and loyalty will, once again, be built. This will also help you to establish teams that will work best together based on their work styles.
  • Acknowledge your talent. When an employee does a good job, it is important that you recognize them for their efforts, so they feel that they are a valued member of the team. A majority of employees leaving a company do so because they feel unappreciated. Employees want to feel that the work they are doing is making a difference, so acknowledging their work often is essential. Also, review surveys and compensation data within your industry to determine what benefits and bonuses should be awarded to your top performers.

Implementing the above suggestions will help your company to build a culture that encourages retention of employees, which in turn will attract top talent. In addition to providing a great work environment that respects employees and provides opportunities for learning and growth, it is also important that they receive a solid benefits package. At WageWatch, we provide accurate compensation and salary data for hospitality, gaming and tribal gaming, healthcare, colleges and universities as well as a wide variety of other industries. To learn more about our up-to-date market compensation data call 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

HUMAN RESOURCES SHIFTING FOCUS FOR 2017

The traditional workforce is changing faster than our organizations can keep up and the way employees work is becoming more fluid, flexible, and dynamic.  In 2017 Human Resource leaders need to rethink traditional policies to meet the needs of a more open, expressive, and changing workforce.  With changing demographics and a more competitive job market, human resources are more challenged than ever before to hire, engage, maintain, and keep employees happy and motivated.  Human Resource Professionals should strive to become more innovative, nimble, and observant, and to create agiler human-natured organizations.

Millennials are now the predominant group in the workplace and we have the most diverse, multi-generational workforce in history. HR professionals are challenged with understanding what drives each group and trying to keep everyone happy.  Benefits and other programs may need to be redesigned to meet those needs.

Over the last couple of decades, technology has made it easier to work and to be expected to work beyond the 40-hour workweek.  While some jobs truly require this, many don’t.   More employees are now pushing back on this trend.  Employers who limit intrusions into employees’ time off will have an edge in attracting and retaining good employees who want to be able to leave their jobs at the office. Help people take time off.  Many employees don’t use all the vacation time that their benefits package offers. This may be because they don’t feel that their workload allows it or due to workplace culture.  Studies show that well-rested, refreshed employees are more productive and less likely to burn out.

Workers want more choice and flexibility in how they approach tasks, for example, more opportunities to work collaboratively.  They look for more opportunities to change duties, for exploration, to learn and to advance in their career in a less linear way.   Put more into training and developing staff.  As companies have tried to do more work for less money, their employees often bear the brunt of those sacrifices.  Make this the year that you invest in your employees as a long-term investment in your organization.

While recent years have been tough on business, it has also been tough on employees.  As business tightened its belt, employees were expected to take on more work, more hours, and more stress.  Budgets may still be tight, but recognizing and rewarding your employees’ efforts is essential.   Get creative with rewards.  Find out what your employees need and want.

Make sure feedback is timely, appropriate, and genuine. This will go a long way with the employee and makes for a more positive workplace environment overall.  Feedback is one of the strongest tools managers have for getting better results from their teams.  Talking to your employees about the areas in which you’d like to see improve or describing what you’d like to see done differently can go a long way toward making that change happen.  Positive feedback will generally keep people motivated and display the behaviors that drove the praise in the first place.

2017 will continue to see our workplaces evolve into more humane, people-centered spaces. Rather than reacting to pressure from business leaders and employees, HR leaders will need to rethink traditional policies to meet the needs of a more open and expressive workforce, taking a front seat in driving successful business outcomes.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary, incentive and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data, and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

INNOVATION IN HUMAN RESOURCES TODAY

How can human resources contribute to innovation?  How can we turn new ideas into reality, break old paradigms and step outside of the box with new solutions to old problems?  Innovation may begin with creativity but it is more than an idea — it takes place when great ideas come to fruition and make their mark in the world.  In the past, most businesses focused on continuous improvement of their products and services to maintain a competitive edge.  But in today’s economy, that’s not always enough.

As Human Resource professionals, we are fortunate to be responsible for many areas of an organization that can directly impact and contribute to innovation; including recruitment, performance management, recognition, rewards, training, and employee engagement.  Human Resources can also play a key role in creating an organizational structure and overall culture that fosters and supports innovation.

Recruiting can focus on hiring for innovation by identifying people who can “think outside the box” or have skills and capabilities that lend toward innovation.  Performance management can serve as a valuable tool in the creation of a sustainable culture of innovation.  Performance measures can give consideration as to whether or not employees are given the time and resources to experiment, generate and explore ideas, and make presentations to management.  Rewards can be used to reinforce the importance of innovation and recognition can be used to encourage and inspire employees to innovate and share ideas.   HR’s role in organizational design provides huge potential for enabling innovation.  For example, organizational design can be used to facilitate easier exchange of employees’ ideas across boundaries and functions.

An example of a human resource driven innovation that used an out-of-the-box idea to improve the recruiting process is La Canterra Resort in San Antonio, TX, A Destination Hotel, they have incorporated an idea made popular by Disney, the Fast PASS. In Disney’s version, guests can avoid the line and use a Fast PASS to get a ticket to ride an attraction at a specified time with limited to no waiting. This helps improve the guest experience, improves wait times, improves communication and enhances the ability to meet the expectation of guests. At Destination Hotels, they have incorporated this concept into their recruitment practices. Special “FAST PASS” cards are given to managers who can spot people in their daily interactions (at grocery stores, restaurants, bars, the mall, etc…) providing exceptional customer service and invite them to consider an employment opening/opportunity with Destination. They can call a specific number and get a “prioritized / guaranteed” in person interview as opposed to filling out an application during certain hours and hoping to a chance to be considered. Like Disney, the approach at Destination Hotels, improves the experience for the candidate and the HR function / hiring managers. It speeds up the ability to source the most qualified talent and create a match to open positon needs at the resort. Destination competes on innovation.

While HR can have a significant impact on many of the key drivers of innovation, it is a collaborative process and requires many areas to come together in order to succeed.    Executive leaders hold the key to the level and success of innovation in their organization. They control the strategic direction, influence the culture, and directly and indirectly control all organizational practices.   Managers must know how to lead innovative teams, and individuals must know how to apply innovative thinking.  Every department or function must be part of the process.  For example, Information Technology has become an enabler of innovative ideas, but it is also often the starting point for innovative products or services and Finance has a unique opportunity through the budget development to add innovation either as a line in the overall budget or as a percentage of every departmental budget.

Organizations need to develop practices that make it easier to innovate.  For example, at the core of an organization’s culture should be an acceptance of the need to experiment and understand that this comes with the risk of failure and that failure needs to be seen as a learning experience and an important step in the process.  Culture is definitely key to sustainable innovation.  The mindset and culture of the HR team has an exponential impact and influence on the entire organization.  HR leaders can help enable their organizations to differentiate themselves by understanding the critical importance of innovation today and how their role can contribute by attracting and keeping the most innovative people, constantly improving their skills and creating and enabling a culture of innovation.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.