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MINIMUM WAGE UPDATE – JULY 2019

State Map w-Increases_Title

 

The U.S. Federal minimum wage has not increased since July 2009, however, many states, cities, and counties have decided to vote into law their own increase in the minimum wage.  Some states have decided to gradually increase their minimum wage to $15.00 per hour over the course of several years.  While most of the wage increases occur at the beginning of the year, other wage increases occur throughout 2019, with TWO states initiating an increase on July 1.

 

There are only FOUR states and the District of Columbia that will increase their minimum wage post the increases that occurred on
January 1, 2019; they include the following:

  • DELAWARE – $9.25/hour, effective 10/1/2019
  • MICHIGAN – $9.45/hour, effective 3/29/2019
  • NEW JERSEY, effective 7/1/2019
    • $10.00/hour (large employer of 6 or more employees)
    • $8.85 (small employers of 5 or fewer employees & seasonal employers)
  • OREGON, effective 7/1/2019
    • $11.25/hour, Urban counties
    • $12.50/hour, Portland metro
    • $11.00/hour, Nonurban counties
  • WASHINGTON DC, effective 7/1/2019
    • $14.00/hour

An overview of the states, cities, or counties which have minimum wage increases beginning July 1, 2018 include:

  • California – Not statewide; increases in the following cities:
    • Alameda
    • Berkeley
    • Daly City
    • Emeryville
    • Fremont
    • Long Beach
    • Los Angeles City
    • Los Angeles County, Unincorporated
    • Malibu
    • Milpitas
    • Oakland
    • Pasadena
    • San Francisco (city and county)
    • San Leandro
    • Santa Monica
  • Illinois – Not statewide, two local jurisdictions:
    • Chicago
    • Cook County
  • Maine
    • Portland 
  • Maryland – Not statewide; one county:
    • Montgomery County
  • Minnesota – Not statewide:
    • City of Minneapolis
  • New Mexico – Not statewide:
    • City of Santa Fe
    • Santa Fe County

For more detailed information click here:  MINIMUM WAGE CHART.  Review the state-specific tabs for detailed information on the city wage increases.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

 

Posted in Wage Forecast on June 12th, 2019 · Comments Off on MINIMUM WAGE UPDATE – JULY 2019

LINKING PAY PRACTICES WITH BUSINESS OBJECTIVES

Link PayCompensation plays a critical role in organizations’ ongoing and increasingly challenging efforts to attract, retain, and motivate a talented workforce.  Compensation design and management play a vital role in aligning employee behavior with business objectives.  Human capital costs represent a significant part of most organizations’ cost bases and need to be spent as effectively as possible.  It is vital to understand the consequences pay decisions can have on your organization.

Salary structures are an important component of effective compensation programs and help ensure that pay levels for groups of jobs are competitive externally and equitable internally.  A well-designed salary structure allows management to reward performance and skills development while controlling overall base salary cost with a salary range cap.  Market pricing is the most common method companies use to design base salary structure ranges using external market data combined with a focus on internal pay equity.  The goal of market pricing is to keep the organization from 1) underpaying, resulting in losing talent to competitors, or being unable to attract the talent it needs and, 2) over-paying which wastes organizational resources and impedes desirable turnover.  The secret to effective market pricing is the ability to spot and adequately analyze and level the data anomalies and imperfections using both science and experience.

Some organizations elect to pay lower than the market and offset lower than market wages with offers of ‘good’ benefits, meaningful work and stability.  This practice can lead to employee disengagement and organizations risk losing people.  Also, the organization will likely attract people who couldn’t get ‘better’ jobs with higher pay.  One of the key determinants of job satisfaction or dissatisfaction is how employees feel their pay package compares to others.

Pay-for-performance programs are used to award employees for desired behaviors and outcomes and they take many forms, including cash bonuses, company stock, and profit sharing.  Pay-for-performance plans have a learning curve, and they require regular maintenance in order to be and remain effective.   Incentive compensation plans need to align with the company’s business strategy, mission, goals, and objectives.  They should address the root causes of performance and the goals must reflect a balance of financial results and the key business drivers.  Payout opportunities should be consistent with the performance value and meaningful to employees.

While pay-for-performance plans provide a financial incentive to employees, there can be disadvantages.   If not crafted carefully, they can cause employees to focus more on quantity over quality.  They may impede teamwork if workers view helping another employee as wasting valuable time that could be spent on reaching their own goals.  And just like base pay, incentive pay should be competitive with the market or it could fall short of motivating the employees.

Smart, successful organizations do regular planning and evaluating their compensation and performance rewards systems.  Compensation is visible and important to employees.  It is critical to have a solid and competitive pay strategy where pay decisions and policies match the objectives of the organization.  At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times.  This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards.  For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

U.S. HOTEL INDUSTRY WAGE GROWTH OUTPACES NATION

With unemployment shrinking to 3.7%, as recently reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the labor market is the tightest it has been in 50 years.

New job openings continue to exceed the numbers reported as unemployed, which puts finding and retaining talent front and center for the hotel industry as hotels compete for new employees with each other and with other industries such as healthcare, food service and retail.

The forecast by STR, parent company of Hotel News Now, of new hotel openings at or around 2% a year through 2019 means hotel room count will increase by an estimated 150,000 to 200,000 rooms by the end of next year.  In terms of housekeepers alone, this equates to another 10,000 to 13,500 new employees just to clean the rooms. Overall, the hotel industry has reached a new employment high every month since the end of the Great Recession and the recovery of the hotel industry beginning in 2010.

The tight labor market also has driven up wages across the country.  Salaries for jobs ranging from line positions at front desks and restaurants to GMs have increased well above the general wage increases experienced across the U.S.  Average annual wage increases in the hotel industry began to exceed 3% a year in 2014 and in 2018 surpassed 4%, compared to a national average wage increase of 1.9% in 2014 and 2.8% in 2018, according to data from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics and WageWatch.

Wages-U.S._Hotel

Even with wage increases in the hotel industry substantially higher than those in the private sector, human resources departments at hotel companies are finding it difficult to obtain and retain new employees.  Some of the issues that are repeatedly reported across the country include:

  • Difficulty hiring quality candidates who can pass a background check and a drug screening
  • New employees have a difficult time adhering to company attendance policies
  • High expectations by new employees of accommodations to be made by employers
  • A trend of applicants not showing up for job interviews
  • New millennial hires seem to be continually looking for their next gig

Looking ahead to 2019, wages in the hotel industry could see increases of 4% to 4.5% across the country, which could have a significant impact on bottom lines.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

 

Posted in Economy, Wage Forecast on December 19th, 2018 · Comments Off on U.S. HOTEL INDUSTRY WAGE GROWTH OUTPACES NATION

MINIMUM WAGE UPDATE – JULY 2018

The U.S. Federal minimum wage has not increased since July 2009, as such, many states, cities, or counties have decided to vote into law, their own increase in the minimum wage.  Some states have decided to gradually increase their minimum wage to $15.00/hour over the course of several years.  While the majority of increases occur at the beginning of the year, others wage increases begin mid-year, starting July 1.

An overview of the states, cities, or counties which have minimum wage increases beginning July 1, 2018 include:

  • California – Not statewide; increases in the following cities:
    • Emeryville
    • Los Angeles City
    • Los Angeles County, Unincorporated
    • Malibu
    • Milpitas
    • San Francisco
    • San Leandro
    • Santa Monica
  • Illinois – Not statewide, two local jurisdictions:
    • Chicago
    • Cook County
  • Maryland – Not statewide; one county:
    • Montgomery County
  • Minnesota – Not statewide:
    • City of Minneapolis
  • Oregon – State law change; varies by area: General, Urban, and Nonurban
  • Washington D.C.

For more detailed information click here:  MINIMUM WAGE CHART.  Review the tab for California to review specific city increases.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

PAY COMPRESSION: CAUSES AND SOLUTIONS

Pay compression is when either a subordinate’s base pay is very close to or more than their supervisor’s or when a less tenured employee is equal to or paid more than a senior employee in the same position.  One of the most common causes of pay compression is when pay increases for current employees are low, but new employees are paid a higher salary to attract them.  This problem becomes more severe in economic downturns when pay increases are limited but it occurs even in better economic times.  Pay compression is most evident in pay systems where lower level jobs, either through union contracts or other market forces, create a situation where first-line supervisors are paid less, on an hourly basis, than their subordinates.

When the job market is weak, many organizations hire people who had already done the same work for another organization, eliminating the need for training. Rather than hiring people with high potential and developing them for the long term, they have opted for people who can “hit the ground running,” regardless of their potential.

When salary compression and the policies that enable it are sustained over several years, it can be demoralizing and lead to widespread employee dissatisfaction. Employers should be concerned because salary compression can transform compensation from a motivator into a de-motivator.

Salary compression may be accompanied by pay inequities which could violate equal pay regulations. In situations where newer staff earn more than experienced staff, it could create a pay equity problem if the experienced staff are a protected class.

There are steps that can limit the detrimental effects of salary compression. For instance, when a new job opens, organizations should try to promote someone from within, rather than hiring from the outside. Many organizations have policies that limit how high within a range new hires can be paid.  When new hires are brought in at higher salaries or when across the board increases are given due to market movement or minimum wage increase, have a policy that requires internal equity analysis and adjustments.

Institute a policy of transparency and calibration across units.   Disparate actions between different organizational units can create salary compression and other inequities. Transparency can take the form of a simple scorecard showing the rates of increases and promotions in each unit. Calibration can involve managers sharing planned compensation actions with their peer managers. It can also include several levels of approval for any actions before they take place so that a senior leader can spot any actions that appear suspect and will cause inequities, including compression.  This tends to create a norm and, over time, leads to decisions that are more consistent and responsible.

Salary compression can be a serious problem that eventually causes an organization to lose some of its most talented employees. Although many organizations have unintentionally allowed salary compression to take root, there are actions they can take now and in the future to keep it from reoccurring.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

RED FLAGS FOR ANTITRUST EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES

The Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice (DOJ) has announced a new initiative to criminally investigate and prosecute employers who enter agreements with their competitors to limit or fix the terms of employment for potential hires.

The DOJ and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued guidance for Human Resources (HR) professionals that provides a deeper explanation of the relevant laws, potential violations, and best practices for avoiding liability.  Here is a link to the guidance that was issued October 2016: https://www.justice.gov/atr/file/903511/download

The following Red Flags” for HR professionals have been identified by the FTC and DOJ as examples of “Antitrust”.  These nine red flags are indicative of what types of agreements or information exchanges may violate the regulations.  This is not an all-inclusive list nor does the presence of a red flag automatically indicate an antitrust violation.

  1. Agree with another company about employee salary or other terms of compensation, either at a specific level or within a range.
  2. Agree with another company to refuse to solicit or hire that other company’s employees.
  3. Agree with another company about employee benefits.
  4. Agree with another company on other terms of employment.
  5. Express to competitors that you should not compete too aggressively for employees.
  6. Exchange company-specific information about employee compensation or terms of employment with another company.
  7. Participate in a meeting, such as a trade association meeting, where the above topics are discussed.
  8. Discuss the above topics with colleagues at other companies, including during social events or in other non-professional settings.
  9. Receive documents that contain another company’s internal data about employee compensation.

In the Guidance, HR employees have been specifically identified as individuals in positions of authority with respect to hiring and compensation decisions and so will need to lead the charge to ensure that their company is not the target of an investigation.

The DOJ’s and FTC’s Guidance provides certain boundaries for common HR practices like benchmarking and participation in compensation surveys to determine whether companies are paying competitive compensation packages to their employees. HR professionals should follow this previously issued detailed guidance on how best to exchange compensation information for benchmarking purposes in an antitrust compliant way. See Statement 6, Provider Participation in Exchanges of Price and Cost Information, United States Dep’t of Justice and Federal Trade Commission, Statements of Antitrust Enforcement Policy in Health Care (Aug. 1996).

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

MANAGING MILLENNIALS IS CHANGING CORPORATE CULTURE

In 2015 Millennials surpassed Generation X to become the largest percentage of workers in the U.S. workforce.  Millennials are a generation that expects transparency, are driven by achieving purpose and fulfillment, prefer open communication, a great company culture, involvement with causes, and are more digital than any generation that preceded it.  Businesses seeking to engage employees in their work will now have to tailor their approaches to Millennials.

Millennials are optimistic and connected and they thrive on innovation and change.  They believe that a single person’s voice can make a difference.  Their preference is for organizations to have open, fair, transparent, and inclusive leadership styles.  They desire direct access to a number of peers and other leaders, rather than being limited to working with one leader or manager; this represents an opportunity for organizations to evolve in ways that benefit both the organization and the employees.

Millennials value leaders who place a strong emphasis on employee well-being, growth, and development, instead of controlling the work experience of each employee.  An organization’s treatment of its employees is of high importance, especially as a leadership quality for the Millennial generation.

To manage Millennials, it is important to show respect, listen to and value their ideas and complaints, including having work structures and processes in place that allow implementation of those ideas.   Millennials need attention and to know that their work and efforts are valued.  Encourage them, and help them develop confidence by giving them opportunities for success as well as turning ‘failure’ into a positive learning experience.

Face-to-face communication is important to Millennials; be sure that the conversation is a two-way street.  Listen to them and learn from them as well.  Millennials are looking for leaders who care about people.  Conversations should be a give and take and a sharing of information and knowledge.  Millennials want leaders who possess strong social skills, have vision, passion, and are decisive.

Millennials do understand productivity expectations, meeting times, project deadlines. It is okay to provide the necessary structure, but do this without micromanaging.  While they like to take projects and run with them, they also want regular and frequent feedback that includes praise, constructive critique, as well as an opportunity for learning and growth.  Millennials want to be sure their work matters in the larger scheme of things.  Millennials want flexibility with job duties and when and where they work.    It will be important to provide development opportunities as well as opportunities to work in teams.

Millennials are a generation that wants to make the world better. They want to work for an ethical company that they believe is behaving in ways to make the world better. Whether through charitable giving, paid leave to help out with charitable work, companies need to demonstrate through tangible and real actions a genuine concern for society and not only for the company’s bottom line.  Millennials want to work for a company known for doing good.

In summary, Millennials are positive-thinking with an entrepreneurial and hard-working spirit; they want their lives to matter and believe they can change the world. They are a fantastic addition to your team and the largest part of the workforce that you will need to rely on more and more into the future.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES BY JOB DESIGN

With changing demographics and a more competitive job market, human resources are more challenged than ever before to hire, engage, maintain and keep employees happy and motivated.  Workers want more choice and flexibility in how they approach tasks, for example, more opportunities to work collaboratively.  They look for more opportunities to change duties, for exploration, to learn and to advance in their career in a less linear way.    It is not only desirable but essential for businesses to have motivated employees.  Today many human resource professionals are looking at how to design jobs, work environments, and cultures that motivate employees.

Job specialization is the earliest approach to job design. Job specialization is efficient but leads to boredom and monotony. Early alternatives to job specialization include job rotation, job enlargement, and job enrichment.

Job rotation involves moving employees from job to job at regular intervals. When employees periodically move to different jobs, the monotonous aspects of job specialization can be relieved.

Job enlargement consists of making a job larger in scope by combining additional task activities into each job through expansion

Job enrichment is concerned with designing jobs that include a greater variety of work content, require a higher level of knowledge and skill, give the worker more autonomy and responsibility, and provide the opportunity for personal growth.

Research shows that there are five job components that increase the motivating potential of a job: skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and feedback.

  • Skills
    • People will be more motivated if they are using a variety of skills in their positions, rather than one thing repeatedly.
  • Tasks
    • Employees are motivated to complete tasks if they identify with them and have seen them through from start to finish.
    • When employees feel that their work is significant to their organization, they are motivated to do well
  • Autonomy
    • Employees like to be able to make decisions and have flexibility in their roles. Most employees will have lowered motivation if they feel they have no freedom or are being micromanaged.
  • Feedback
    • Employees need feedback (both positive and negative) in order to stay motivated.

The quality of life in a total job and work environment is also an important part of a positive and motivating experience for employees.  The elements included in ‘quality of life’ include open communication equitable reward system, employees’ job security and satisfaction, participative management, development of employee skill, etc.  Since a significant amount of one’s life is spent at work, jobs need to provide satisfaction for sustained interest.  Jobs provide employees not only a living but also help in achieving other goals such as economic, social, political and cultural.

The concept of empowerment extends the idea of autonomy.  The idea behind empowerment is that employees have the ability to make decisions and perform their jobs effectively.  Instead of dictating employees roles, companies create an environment where employees thrive, feel motivated, and have the discretion to make decisions about the content and context of their jobs. Empowerment is a contemporary way of motivating employees through job design.

A growing body of research on the relational structures of jobs suggests that interpersonal relationships play a key role in making the work experience important and meaningful to employees.  Interpersonal relationships can often enhance employees’ motivations, opportunities, and resources at work.

Though employees need to have some intrinsic motivation (internal motivation) to complete the tasks assigned to them in their roles, they also need to be motivated by their employers. By designing jobs that encompass all of the core characteristics, you can help increase employee motivation, in turn improving performance.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary, incentive and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data, and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

NEW FLSA OVERTIME REGULATIONS ARE IN TURMOIL

In September, 21 states sued the Department of Labor to block implementation of the FLSA overtime regulations slated to go into effect on December 1st of this year.  Separately, over 50 business groups challenged the DOL’s authority to establish a salary test for determining if an employee is or is not exempt from overtime. Those two cases were eventually consolidated.  On November 22nd, federal judge Amos Mazzant, a judge for the eastern district of Texas, appointed by President Barack Obama, entered a nationwide preliminary injunction to stop the implementation of the new overtime regulations. The new regulations would have increased the minimum salary for exempt “white collar” executive, administrative and professional employees from $455 per week to $913 per week, or $47,476 per year.

The Federal Court ruled that Congress intended the EAP exemption to apply to employees doing actual executive, administrative, and professional duties rather than an employee’s salary.  The Court concluded, that the new regulations, which raise the salary threshold significantly would have created “essentially a de facto salary-only test.”  The Court explained, “[t]he [DOL’s] role is to carry out Congress’s intent.  If Congress intended the salary requirement to supplant the duties test, then Congress, and not the Department, should make that change.”

This past Thursday, December 1st, the DOL filed an appeal asking the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn the preliminary injunction against its new overtime regulations. Since an appeal in the Fifth Circuit can take a year or more, many labor experts and attorneys expect there will be further legislative or administrative action once the Inauguration occurs and a new Secretary of Labor is in place and this likely will happen well before a final court ruling takes place.

However, many employers have already implemented changes, by either raising exempt employees’ salaries to meet the new threshold or reclassifying employees who are still earning less to nonexempt status.  Employers who have already implemented such changes, may want to leave decisions in place as It would be difficult to take back salary increases.  Employers may want to postpone reclassifications that have not yet been done to give the litigation a chance to play out.  And Employers may want to communicate that there may be future changes depending on Federal Court, Congressional, or Trump administration activities.  Employers shouldn’t assume that the overtime rule will be permanently barred and should have a plan to move forward if necessary in the future.

This said, here are a few possible future scenarios that could unfold:

  • A lame-duck Congress comes up with a compromise bill for President Obama’s signature (not likely);
  • President Elect Trump addresses this after his confirmation by abandoning the Obama administration’s defense of the final rule; and
  • The new administration may introduce legislation seeking a compromise, with a lower, or graduated salary threshold increase, and without the automatic escalator clause.

Regardless of what action the current administration or the new administration take, it is very likely we will see more activity at the state and local government levels. Unions are leading the effort for a $15 minimum wage at the state and local levels. They have had some success in California, Oregon, Washington and New York. As part of that effort, adding a doubling of salary for exempt employees is a logical extension of the unions’ efforts. Why? Because the minimum wage effort impacts exempt employees under FLSA. Exempt employees who are not paid for overtime may see their line employees earning more than they do.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

ALIGNING COMPENSATION WITH COMPANY CULTURE

Many organizations today are focusing on their company’s culture including determining their culture, deciding what it should be, aligning with strategic goals and transitioning to the desired culture.  Culture is important because it reinforces the values in the organization, which in turn shapes team members behavior.  There are many success stories of companies with cultures that are aligned to their business goals including Google, Zappos, and Patagonia.  These companies have not only developed a culture that supports their business, but have fully embraced their culture.

Organizational culture is the collective behavior of the people who are part of the organization and has important effects on the morale and motivation of the organizational members.  It includes the values, norms, systems, beliefs, attitudes and habits of the organization and affects the interactions of the employees with each other, and with customers.  Even before you define it, you know it is there and that it has an impact on your business. This is why it is so important to internalize the culture and understanding when company activities are in sync or not with the culture.

Once the company values and desired culture are defined, compensation can support and help drive the values and corporate culture.  It is important that the role of compensation in an organization and the compensation strategy are also defined.  For example, where does the organization want to set pay levels in comparison to the competitive market?  Perhaps the organization’s culture is strong on training and developing its employees, acknowledging their successes and offering advancement opportunities. This in turn may allow the organization to set lower pay levels than what is paid in the market.  Of course, when recruiting it is important to align the compensation strategy to support the values of the culture through highlighting performance management, performance appraisals and the goal setting process for each team member.

Once values, business objectives and desired behaviors are determined then compensation plans can be put in place to support the culture.  For example, if the business objective is innovation and the desired behavior is risk-taking, then short term incentives may be the compensation strategy.  If the goal is for a highly trained workforce and the behavior is learning and upgrading skills, then skill or competency based pay may be the compensation strategy.

Corporate culture is about people’s behaviors – how goals are accomplished – so to establish a culture that drives company success, organizations should link a significant component of their compensation systems to behaviors.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs and help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online .