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The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Business

The Affordable Care Act is already causing much confusion for American companies as well as for the general public. The law, as passed, was over 2,500 pages long and will require thousands of additional pages of regulatory policy in order to be enacted.  As we enter the year 2013, there will be many more changes to healthcare as the new law and the regulatory policies surrounding it take effect. As the provider of employee benefits, business owners need to fully understand the impact that the Affordable Care Act will have on their business and their employees over the next few years.

The professionals at WageWatch would like to share the following refresher on some of the most important policies within the Affordable Care Act:

1. Small business owners will receive a tax credit on their contribution to employee insurance policies. For businesses with less than 10 employees, each with average wages under $25,000, they will receive a 50 percent tax credit on their contribution. These tax credits apply to all small businesses up to 50 employees with average wages of $50,000, although the credit is reduced on a sliding scale depending on the businesses size and average salary.

2. Beginning in the year 2018, the Affordable Care Act will impose a 35 percent tax on employer provided health insurance plans that exceed $10,200 for individual coverage and $27,500 for coverage of a family. The idea behind this policy is that business owners will aim to avoid expensive insurance policies known as Cadillac Plans, and insurance companies will be forced to modify coverage with an eye to keeping costs down.

3. If you are a small business with 51 or more full time employees, you will be fined $2,000 per employee, excluding the first 30 employees, if you do not offer insurance for employees that work an average of 30 or more hours each week.  For small businesses with 50 or fewer employees, there is no penalty. Small businesses of all sizes are also not required to provide insurance for part-time employees.

4. Business owners must offer insurance that is certified affordable to employees. The premium for each employee’s plan cannot exceed 9.5 percent of their total household income. If the insurance coverage doesn’t meet the affordability law, employees should be offered tax credits to purchase insurance on their own. Business owners will then have to pay whichever is less: $3,000 per employee that receives the credit or $2,000 per employee, excluding the first 30 workers.

5. Businesses with less than 100 employees that work an average of 25 or more hours per week are eligible for grants to start wellness programs. These programs encourage employees to take control of their health by living more healthy lifestyles, which helps to prevent harmful health conditions down the road.

It is clear from just the five points above, that much is still to be determined before implementation can take effect. Please stay tuned as we will continue to provide you with updates on ACA as more information becomes available.

The experts at WageWatch want you to know how important it is to be aware of the new policies under the Affordable Care Act and their effect on small businesses. Employers need to properly plan for the future by developing accurate budgets that take the changing costs of healthcare benefits into consideration for the year 2013 and beyond. For assistance with your budget, WageWatch offers cost-effective reports, including salary, wages and benefits survey data. To learn more about the services provided by WageWatch, please call 480-237-6130 or contact us online.

 

This entry was posted on Wednesday, December 12th, 2012 at 7:57 PM and is filed under Regulatory & Legal Updates. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Comments are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.