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MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES BY JOB DESIGN

Motivate

With changing demographics and a more competitive job market, human resources are more challenged than ever before to hire, engage, maintain, and keep employees happy and motivated.  Workers want more choice and flexibility in how they approach tasks, for example, more opportunities to work collaboratively.  They look for more opportunities to change duties, for exploration, to learn, and to advance in their career in a less linear way.  It is not only desirable but essential for businesses to have motivated employees.  Today many human resource professionals are looking at how to design jobs, work environments, and cultures that motivate employees.

Job specialization is the earliest approach to job design.   Job specialization is efficient but leads to boredom and monotony.  Early alternatives to job specialization include job rotation, job enlargement, and job enrichment.

Job rotation involves moving employees from job-to-job at regular intervals.  When employees periodically move to different jobs, the monotonous aspects of job specialization can be relieved.

Job enlargement consists of making a job larger in scope by combining additional task activities into each job through expansion.

Job enrichment is concerned with designing jobs that include a greater variety of work content, require a higher level of knowledge and skill, give the worker more autonomy and responsibility, and provide an opportunity for personal growth.

Research shows that there are five job components that increase the motivating potential of a job:  skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and feedback.

  • Skills
    • People will be more motivated if they are using a variety of skills in their positions, rather than one thing repeatedly.
  • Tasks
    • Employees are motivated to complete tasks if they identify with them and have seen them through from start to finish.
    • When employees feel that their work is significant to their organization, they are motivated to do well.
  • Autonomy
    • Employees like to be able to make decisions and have flexibility in their roles. Most employees will have lowered motivation if they feel they have no freedom or are being micromanaged.
  • Feedback
    • Employees need feedback (both positive and negative) in order to stay motivated.

Quality of life in a total job and work environment is also an important part of a positive and motivating experience for employees.  The elements included in ‘quality of life’ include:  open communication, an equitable reward system, employees’ job security and satisfaction, participative management, and development of employee skill, etc.  Since a significant amount of one’s life is spent at work, jobs need to provide satisfaction for sustained interest.  Jobs provide employees not only a living but also help in achieving other goals such as economic, social, political, and cultural.

The concept of empowerment extends the idea of autonomy.  The idea behind empowerment is that employees have the ability to make decisions and perform their jobs effectively.  Instead of dictating roles, companies create an environment where employees thrive, feel motivated, and have the discretion to make decisions about the content and context of their jobs.  Empowerment is a contemporary way of motivating employees through job design.

A growing body of research on the relational structures of jobs suggests that interpersonal relationships play a key role in making the work experience important and meaningful to employees.  Interpersonal relationships can often enhance employees’ motivations, opportunities, and resources at work.

Though employees need to have some intrinsic motivation (internal motivation) to complete the tasks assigned to them in their roles, they also need to be motivated by their employers.  By designing jobs that encompass all of the core characteristics, you can help increase employee motivation, in turn improving performance.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary, incentive, and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data, and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

Posted in Uncategorized on February 13th, 2019 · Comments Off on MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES BY JOB DESIGN

EMPLOYER USE OF BIOMETRIC DATA

 

The value of biometric data is that it is impervious to abuse and falsification; it enables HR Professionals to accurately monitor employee attendance and ensure buildings are accessed only by authorized personnel.  It is easy to operate and reduces administrative time.
Biometric Data

Biometric data includes measurable human biological or behavioral characteristics that can be used for identification.  It includes fingerprints, voiceprint, retina or iris scans, and scans of hands or face geometry.  In the work environment, a common example includes the use of employee fingerprints to access facilities or clock in and out through timekeeping systems.  Buddy punching is a common wage theft problem when coworkers clock in for an employee who is not at work.  The American Payroll Association estimates that 75% of all businesses lose money due to buddy punching.
Healthcare has incorporated the use of biometric data.  In some hospitals, physicians access electronic health data via a finger or iris scanning biometrics security system.  Biometrics technology can be used for patient registration and identification to ensure that medical records are properly associated with each patient.  This technology can be especially helpful to identify a child and link to the appropriate medical record, especially when a child is not able to communicate.
The use of biometric data is becoming more common and laws are continuing to develop to provide more guidance to employers about proper ways to collect, store, and use the data.  Illinois was the first state to develop legislation by passing the Biometrics Information Privacy Act (BIPA).  The Act seeks to protect individual privacy and requires employers to adopt policies regarding biometric data collection and retention, obtain consent before collecting biometric data, and take steps to securely store and protect from disclosure any biometric information that is collected.  It is only in limited circumstances that an employer is able to disclose biometric information; an employer may not sell, lease, trade, or profit from any individual’s biometric information.  Recently (1/25/19), the Supreme Court of Illinois decided that private entities can be held liable for monetary damages for technical violations of BIPA.  Numerous entities (including hotels and hospitals) have been sued for technical violations with damages awarded to each technical violation.  The penalties of BIPA can range from $1,000 to $5,000 per violation and include attorney fees.
Since 2008 when Illinois passed BIPA, both Washington and Texas passed similar laws, however, BIPA remains the only law that allows private individuals to file a lawsuit for damages stemming from a violation.  Other states considering laws on biometric data include New York, Montana, Idaho, California, Alaska, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.
In order to ensure that your company is compliant, it is important to review any applicable state and federal laws related to handling employee biometric information.  Obligations extend beyond employee information and include the handling of client or third-party biometric information.  These steps are important even if your state has not passed laws that affect the organization’s use of biometric data.
WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times.  This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards.  For more information on our services, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

ENGAGED VERSUS DISENGAGED EMPLOYEES—WHAT IS THE COST?

Employee Engagement

Employee engagement levels are at their highest in years.  The Gallup Organization has been measuring levels of employee engagement since 2000.  Over nearly two decades, the annual percentage of actively engaged U.S. employees has ranged from a low of 26% in 2000 to the recent six-month high of 34% in 2018.  On average, 30% of employees have been engaged at work during the past 18 years.  Conversely, the percentage of actively disengaged U.S. employees has ranged from a high of 20% in 2007 and 2008, during the heart of the recession, to the current low of 13%.   On average 16.5% of U.S. employees have been actively disengaged over 18 years of tracking.

To better understand employee engagement levels, it helps to understand how Gallup categories the three different segments of employee engagement.  “Engaged” employees are involved, enthusiastic, and committed to their work while “actively disengaged” employees are unhappy at work and aren’t afraid to tell others about it; they are resentful that their needs aren’t being met and act out, potentially undermining co-workers.  The biggest group of employees are those “not engaged;” they are unattached to their work and while putting in the time, there is no energy or passion put into their work.  To summarize, the 2018 Gallup survey results categorizes employees as:

  • Engaged = 34%
  • Not Engaged/Disengaged = 53%
  • Actively Disengaged = 13%

What is the cost of unengaged employees to an organization?  Gallup indicates that an “actively disengaged” employee will cost their organization $3,400 for every $10,000 of salary, or 34%.  For example, if an average salary is $60,000 per year, the cost for each disengaged employee is $20,400 ($60,000 x .34).  For a company with 1,000 employees, 13% are actively disengaged, for a total of 130 employees.  In this example, the total annual cost to the organization is $2.65 million (130 employees x $20,400).  This monetary loss to the organization is only for the actively disengaged employees and does not represent the loss among employees who are in the “disengaged” (53%) segment.  However, it is compelling to understand the cost for the most “actively disengaged” employees, knowing that the cost of total employee disengagement would be higher.

After computing the cost of disengagement, the focus shifts to increasing engagement.  Based on attributes measured by Gallup in their employee engagement survey, employees place the greatest importance on a role and organization that offers them:

  • The ability to do what they do best
  • Greater work-life balance and better personal well-being
  • Greater stability and job security
  • A significant increase in income
  • The opportunity to work for a company with a great brand or reputation

How do organization increase engagement within their organization?  Some time-tested methods include the following:

  • Develop great managers, they have a tremendous impact on their employee’s experience within your organization. Build a strong manager development program to ensure employees have great bosses.
  • Managers need to schedule on-going career conversation with their employees. Statistics demonstrate that employees want to have career conversations with their boss; it shows the employee that someone at work encourages their development.
  • Build a learning/development culture—one of the primary reasons employees leave a job is to gain career development. Building a learning culture demonstrates to employees that the organization cares about their personal development and that there are advancement opportunities for them within the organization.
  • Allow greater flexibility in the work environment. In 2016, the Gallup survey measured that 43% of employees worked remotely in some capacity.  The findings demonstrated that engagement climbs when employees spend some time working remotely and some time working in a location with their co-workers.  The greatest return exists when employees maintain some balance:  working remotely most of the time but still getting face time with managers and co-workers.
  • Prioritize and demonstrate diversity and inclusion at levels. If employees feel unwelcome they are less likely to care about their position.

For an organization to prioritize increasing employee engagement, it is important to develop an ongoing measurement of engagement. To better understand the specific tactics that will increase engagement within your organization, measure engagement through employee surveys to determine what works and doesn’t work at your organization.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date HR metrics, benefit survey data, market compensation data, and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is a custom-built survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

Posted in Uncategorized on January 30th, 2019 · Comments Off on ENGAGED VERSUS DISENGAGED EMPLOYEES—WHAT IS THE COST?

BEST PRACTICES FOR BONUS COMMUNICATION AND DELIVERY

Bonus

The primary purpose of an annual incentive or bonus plan is to drive and reward behaviors that have an impact on the operating success of the company.  When designing your incentive plan you need to have a clear measurement system for what success is in your company and then make sure the measurements are meaningful to the employees who are doing the work.  For any incentive plan to be effective it needs to be meaningful and have clarity relating both to the plan provisions and to the results needed to earn and maximize an award and the award should be attainable.  Employees need to see a link between how their job performance affects results, and the award amount needs to be sufficient enough to motivate.

Generally, two to four performance metrics are included in a bonus plan design.  The metrics are primarily financial, though quantifiable business objectives can also be used. Corporate or business unit financial metrics are used to fund the incentive pool, and individual performance measures may also be used to determine final individual payouts.  Results that are measured can be quantitative and qualitative, such as customer service quality, the number of customers served, the effectiveness of programs, etc. Often a balanced scorecard approach is used.

Employers should give careful attention not only to the design but also to the implementation and communication of incentive programs.  The most common pitfall when creating a bonus program is inadequate communication.  Bonus plan communications should be both clear and timely.  Make sure the plan is communicated prior to the beginning of the bonus period and this initial bonus communication should address the structure of the plan, decision-making criteria, fairness, measurability, and target.  Equally important are follow-up communications regarding the progress toward attainment of the goals that should happen at frequent and regular intervals throughout the bonus plan period.  You want your employees to have an on-going understanding of where they are and what they need to do to meet and/or exceed their bonus target.

When bonuses are paid or awarded, clear communications again are very important.  Managers should have individual meetings with each bonus plan recipient and clearly communicate the outcome of the incentive period.  Whatever the amount, be sure to let the recipient know that he/she is valued.  Be sure to discuss specific accomplishments and strengths that went into the bonus award.  If the employee was expecting more, be sure to emphasize the broader context of the company’s approach to bonuses.   Let each person know how the bonus was calculated.  No matter what the award is, the conversation regarding the award amount is an opportunity not only for clarity and understanding, but to thank the individual for their hard work and to hopefully improve morale and motivate for future performance.

Employees want to know they are being fairly compensated for their work and their job performance.  Bonus plans that are meaningful to your employees and aligned with the bottom line of your company can help build morale and drive behaviors that are critical to the success of the company.

WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary, incentive, and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. The PeerMark™ Wage Survey is the only Web-based custom survey tool that allows individual survey participants to select their competitive set for comparison purposes.  Our experienced compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs.  We can help you ensure internal equity and compliance with regulations as well as help you structure your compensation programs to support your company’s business strategy and objectives.   For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

Posted in Benefits & Compensation on January 23rd, 2019 · Comments Off on BEST PRACTICES FOR BONUS COMMUNICATION AND DELIVERY

POTENTIAL FOR 2019 IN THE LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW AREA

Labor Law 2019

While 2018 ushered in some important changes at the federal level in labor and employment law such as:

  • The Fair Labor Standards Act is amended to address tipped employees and tip ownership
  • The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act which impacts certain deductions and reporting provisions
  • Regulatory interpretations from the NLRB which reversed course from its previous decisions

It saw its strongest “advocate” in the passing of new laws from the local and state arena.   What will be some of the continuing trends for 2019?

We believe employers should continue to prepare for the following trends:

  • As marijuana use, both recreational and medicinal, become more widely accepted at state and local levels, look for more court’s and administrative interpretations with respect to zero tolerance drug policies
  • Required sexual harassment training
  • Increase in mandatory paid and unpaid time off including sick leave, military leave, and family leave
  • Restrictions on salary history questions
  • Cybersecurity requirements for the protection of employee data and employer procedures for dealing with breaches

Additionally, employers should keep their eye on minimum wage increases (both state and local) during 2019, “ban the box”, predictive scheduling and [at the federal level] the continued NLRB’s “reverse course” in the previous administration’s decisions as well as potential immigration policies.

Guest author:  Pautsch, Spognardi & Baiocchi Legal Group  (www.psb-attorneys.com)

Posted in Uncategorized on January 15th, 2019 · Comments Off on POTENTIAL FOR 2019 IN THE LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW AREA

MINIMUM WAGE UPDATE – JANUARY 2019

The current federal minimum wage, under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), is $7.25 per hour which has been in effect since July 2009.  States have the ability to set a rate that is higher than the federal minimum rate and employers are obligated to pay the higher rate.  Currently, there are 29 states that have laws at the state or local level mandating higher pay than the federal rate.

On September 4, 2018, the Department of Labor published a Notice in the Federal Register to announce that, beginning January 1, 2019, the Executive Order 13658 minimum wage rate is increased to $10.60 per hour.  This Executive Order minimum wage rate generally must be paid to workers performing work on or in connection with covered contracts.  Additionally, beginning January 1, 2019, tipped employees performing work on or in connection with covered contracts generally must be paid a minimum cash wage of $7.40 per hour.

Voters across many states approved ballot measures to raise their state minimum rates over time, with increases occurring through 2020 and beyond.  There are 19 states which have an increase that takes effect on December 31, 2018 or January 1, 2019, including:  1) Alaska, 2) Arizona, 3) Arkansas, 4) California, 5) Colorado, 6) Delaware, 7) Florida, 8) Maine, 9) Massachusetts, 10) Minnesota, 11) Missouri, 12) Montana, 13) New Jersey, 14) New York, 15) Ohio, 16) Rhode Island, 17) South Dakota, 18) Vermont, 19) Washington.

For more details, click on the following link to view the WageWatch Minimum Wage Chart with details of federal, state and local minimum wage increases:  WageWatch – U.S. Minimum Wage Increases.  In addition to the statewide minimum wage increase, multiple states have approved minimum wage increases that are higher than the statewide average.  (The increases are referenced in the attached Excel spreadsheet).  There is one state, Oregon, and the District of Columbia that have scheduled their wage increase to begin on July 1, 2019.

Although there are no statewide minimum wage increases, there are several states in which specific cities and/or counties which have wage increases scheduled to occur on 1/1/2019; these states include:  Illinois, Maryland, and New Mexico.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

THE BOOMER GENERATION IN THE WORKPLACE

It is not uncommon for baby boomers to now work side by side with co-workers from generation X and generation Y.  Each of the generations in the workplace today grew up in times with widely varying political and social issues, technology and other factors, which have affected their attitudes on everyday life.  As an employer, it’s important that you understand each of the generations you employ in order to provide them with the work environment and rewards that make them most happy.

The basic employment packages for businesses are based on the needs of baby boomers, a very loyal generation of workers, typically staying with the same company for many years.  Employees of this generation value their benefits, such as health insurance, life insurance, and vacation time.  To determine if their company is providing salaries and benefits that are on target with the industry average salary, many employers turn to market compensation and benefit survey data.  These baby boomer employees that have stayed with a company for most of their careers have invaluable knowledge and experience that is essential to business operations, so it’s important that employers keep them happy and reward them for their loyalty.

While it is important to keep baby boomers satisfied by analyzing market compensation data, benefit survey data and salary reports, it is also essential for employers to look at the needs of the upcoming generations.  Many baby boomers are in management positions but will start to retire around the same time leaving a large number of open positions.  It is essential that skilled employees of the X and Y generations be ready to take their place.

The new generations of workers enjoy benefits like the baby boomers, but these employees prefer additional incentives and small tokens of appreciation for their efforts.  This generation is not as loyal to the companies they work for, and have no problem moving to a job at another company every two or three years.  For this reason, it is even more important to build loyalty with employees of these generations by providing them with the benefits and incentives they desire. It is very beneficial for companies to use benefit survey data, market compensation data, and salary reports to determine the types of compensation, including incentives that are standard for the industry.  Having this data will help companies to stay competitive with other employers by creating appealing benefits packages that will attract and retain top talent.

Today’s world moves fast, and as an employer, you should constantly be monitoring and adjusting your business operations to meet the ever-changing wants and needs of your employees.  At WageWatch, we offer accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times.  This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including market compensation data, benefit survey data, and salary reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

U.S. HOTEL INDUSTRY WAGE GROWTH OUTPACES NATION

With unemployment shrinking to 3.7%, as recently reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the labor market is the tightest it has been in 50 years.

New job openings continue to exceed the numbers reported as unemployed, which puts finding and retaining talent front and center for the hotel industry as hotels compete for new employees with each other and with other industries such as healthcare, food service and retail.

The forecast by STR, parent company of Hotel News Now, of new hotel openings at or around 2% a year through 2019 means hotel room count will increase by an estimated 150,000 to 200,000 rooms by the end of next year.  In terms of housekeepers alone, this equates to another 10,000 to 13,500 new employees just to clean the rooms. Overall, the hotel industry has reached a new employment high every month since the end of the Great Recession and the recovery of the hotel industry beginning in 2010.

The tight labor market also has driven up wages across the country.  Salaries for jobs ranging from line positions at front desks and restaurants to GMs have increased well above the general wage increases experienced across the U.S.  Average annual wage increases in the hotel industry began to exceed 3% a year in 2014 and in 2018 surpassed 4%, compared to a national average wage increase of 1.9% in 2014 and 2.8% in 2018, according to data from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics and WageWatch.

Wages-U.S._Hotel

Even with wage increases in the hotel industry substantially higher than those in the private sector, human resources departments at hotel companies are finding it difficult to obtain and retain new employees.  Some of the issues that are repeatedly reported across the country include:

  • Difficulty hiring quality candidates who can pass a background check and a drug screening
  • New employees have a difficult time adhering to company attendance policies
  • High expectations by new employees of accommodations to be made by employers
  • A trend of applicants not showing up for job interviews
  • New millennial hires seem to be continually looking for their next gig

Looking ahead to 2019, wages in the hotel industry could see increases of 4% to 4.5% across the country, which could have a significant impact on bottom lines.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.

 

 

Posted in Economy, Wage Forecast on December 19th, 2018 · Comments Off on U.S. HOTEL INDUSTRY WAGE GROWTH OUTPACES NATION

STRATEGIC ISSUES AND THE PAY MODEL

Strategic Pay

Perceptions of compensation vary.  It is seen as a measure of equity and justice.  Stockholders are focused on executive compensation.  Legislators may view average annual pay changes as a guide to adjusting eligibility for social services.  Employees see compensation as a reward for their services and a job well done.  Managers will view compensation from the perspective of a labor cost, but also from a competitive perspective that enables them to recruit, engage and retain employees.  The four basic compensation policy decisions that an employer must consider in managing compensation are: 1) internal consistency, 2) external competitiveness, 3) employee contributions, and 4) administration of the pay system.  The balance between the four policies becomes the employer’s compensation strategy.

It is important that compensation is linked to an organization’s overall goals and strategies and aligned with the Human Resource strategy.  Not doing so, can lead to serious issues of employee retention, engagement, and productivity that can be laborious and expensive to repair.  Compensation for many organizations is the single largest business expense and is visible and important to employees, managers, and stockholders.  Therefore it is important to strategically plan and regularly evaluate compensation systems.  Working with your company’s executives is critical to ensuring your compensation philosophy is supporting business objectives.  Strategic objectives will include significant challenges and priorities now and over the next two to five years.  Some examples are business growth plans, key talent and training objectives, market competition, and whether or not you are in a union environment.  Some other key considerations for your compensation program are:

  • Attracting the appropriate skill sets and types of employees when needed
  • Rewarding employees for their efforts, such as increasing workloads, taking on new tasks and projects
  • Employee morale and perceived value of the company’s benefits, incentives, and work environment
  • A mix of base pay, incentive pay, work environment and benefits that makes the most sense for the organization
  • The link between base and incentive pay with performance
  • Legal issues such as wage and hour

An example of a compensation strategy that aligns with other Human Resource initiatives is matching pay ranges to the desired outcome.  If quality, experience, and a sophisticated skill set are a strategic advantage to an organization, then it will not be successful in hiring employees significantly below the market rate.  Determining whether the organization wants to lead, lag, or match the market is a key decision.  A ‘mixed market position’ approach has become more common as employers realize that a one-size-fits-all strategy does not fit the entire workforce.  For example, location and market competitiveness will impact your pay levels and certain key or hard to fill or retain positions may require pay well above the market, while other positions may be ok with a lag approach.

A successful compensation program will focus on top priorities, guide employees to where their effort can create the most value, create financial and non-financial consequences for success and failure, drive and reward the development of skills and encourage teamwork and collaboration.  Many organizations today keep an eye toward aligning workers’ interests with company goals through innovative types of rewards in the workplace, including skill-based pay and goal sharing.  The right total rewards system is a blend of monetary and nonmonetary rewards offered to employees and can generate valuable business results.  These results range from enhanced individual and organizational performance to improved job satisfaction, employee loyalty, and workforce morale.

Maintaining a competitive advantage and being able to retain key employees is increasingly important.  At WageWatch, our compensation consultants can assist with your organization’s compensation needs and help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives.  WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit survey data, market compensation data and salary reports that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online .

PLANNING AN OFFICE HOLIDAY PARTY?

Office Party

Hosting a holiday party has been a tradition among many companies as a way to reward employees, boost morale, and encourage team spirit.  This year, fewer employers are planning to host a party.  Based on a recent study, only two-thirds of companies intend to host a holiday party, the lowest percentage since 2009.  Economic factors do not seem to be a reason as companies report tax savings and a thriving economy.

Among companies sponsoring a party, nearly 60 percent have real concerns about sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior, especially in light of the #MeToo movement.  More than half of these companies have addressed the #MeToo issue this year and if not, one-third indicated that they will do so prior to the party.

If you are planning a holiday party, there are some proactive steps that can be taken to lessen your company’s liability:

  • Establish written anti-harassment policies and publish in employee handbooks; reference the policies prior to the holiday party
  • Send a memo to remind employees to act responsibly and professionally (address company’s stance on pictures being posted to social media as well as the dress/attire for the party)
  • Ensure employees understand attendance is voluntary (especially when held outside of normal work hours)
  • The focus for the holiday decorations, music, and gifts should be seasonal in nature and not religious
  • Emphasize to management that they should lead by example
  • Consider having a holiday party in which no alcohol is served
  • Hold the party offsite; it limits the company’s liability
  • Set-up a cash bar—guests will drink less if they are required to pay
  • If alcohol is served, set a tone of moderation. Consider providing a limited number of drink tickets per guest, restrict the types of alcohol served, and/or only serve alcohol for a limited time
  • Consider featuring activities/games at the party, it encourages team-building and diverts attention away from cell-phones (also limits focus on drinking)
  • When alcohol is present, offer non-alcoholic beverages and always serve food
  • Stop serving alcohol toward the end of the evening and switch to coffee, tea, and soft drinks
  • Arrange for alternative transportation; encourage employees and guests to use it if they consume any alcohol

While these tips are not a guarantee against holiday party problems, they can be a good foundation for an effective defense against liability if problems should come to pass.

At WageWatch our compensation consultants are focused on your organization’s compensation needs and ready to help you ensure that your compensation programs are supporting your company’s business strategy and objectives. WageWatch also offers accurate, up-to-date benefit surveys, salary surveys and pay practices data that will allow you to stay current with the times. This information is highly beneficial in creating the best salary and benefits packages that meet or rival the industry standards. For more information on our services, including consulting, salary survey data, benefit survey data and market compensation reports, please call WageWatch at 888-330-9243 or contact us online.